Pomeranian State Museum

Greifswald, Germany

The Pomeranian State Museum is primarily dedicated to Pomeranian history and arts. The largest exhibitions show archeological findings and artefacts from the Pomerania region and paintings, e.g. of Caspar David Friedrich, who was a Greifswald local. The museum was established in the years of 1998 to 2005 at the site of the historical Franziskaner abbey.

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Founded: 1998
Category: Museums in Germany

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monika S (2 years ago)
Spannend, vielseitig und informativ wird hier in Modern gestalteten historischen Räumen Geschichte, Kunst und Kultur der Region vermittelt. Sehr freundlicher, hilfsbereiter Service. Behindertengerechte Zugänge. Aufwändige Inszenierung der Fakten, facettenreiche Darstellung machen Vergangenes lebendig. Mich begeisterte die Malerei: nachdem wir das Kloster Eldena gesehen haben, hier nun die Darstellung des C.D. Friedrich und der Romantiker. Sehr sehenswert und ein Erlebnis, das Sie sich gönnen sollten. Greifswald gewinnt neue Dimensionen und Sie neue Einsichten. Lassen Sie sich begeistern!
Claudio Marcos Krueger (3 years ago)
Tem um espaço com peças de Pomerode, SC. Muito bom ver a história dos nossos antepassados.
Inge Fischer (3 years ago)
Ok
Quentin Watt (4 years ago)
The Museum is located next to the old city wall in Greifswald, which is also an interesting tourist site. The museum has a very modern feel to it with a few interactive pieces. There is also an art gallery showing off some of the most famous works from the area, including some of the work from Caspar David Friedrich (the most famous artist from this town.)
Ian Burton (4 years ago)
Excellent local museum, very atmospheric and well thought out
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