Pomeranian State Museum

Greifswald, Germany

The Pomeranian State Museum is primarily dedicated to Pomeranian history and arts. The largest exhibitions show archeological findings and artefacts from the Pomerania region and paintings, e.g. of Caspar David Friedrich, who was a Greifswald local. The museum was established in the years of 1998 to 2005 at the site of the historical Franziskaner abbey.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1998
Category: Museums in Germany

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jobst Kannegiesser (18 months ago)
Very comprehensive museum covering history and developments in Pomerania.
Iskiermakis (2 years ago)
Can be checked if you are very bored
IOANNIS D (2 years ago)
Amazing museum. Lots of exhibits of various interests and ages. Paintings (including some Caspar David Friedrich ones), stone artifacts, tapestries etc. well displayd. So why 3 stars only? Because no exhibit has an inscription in English - you need to speak German. I had to guess what I was looking at. So a 6 star museum with a 3 star rating. What a pity for such a museum...
Monika S (2 years ago)
Spannend, vielseitig und informativ wird hier in Modern gestalteten historischen Räumen Geschichte, Kunst und Kultur der Region vermittelt. Sehr freundlicher, hilfsbereiter Service. Behindertengerechte Zugänge. Aufwändige Inszenierung der Fakten, facettenreiche Darstellung machen Vergangenes lebendig. Mich begeisterte die Malerei: nachdem wir das Kloster Eldena gesehen haben, hier nun die Darstellung des C.D. Friedrich und der Romantiker. Sehr sehenswert und ein Erlebnis, das Sie sich gönnen sollten. Greifswald gewinnt neue Dimensionen und Sie neue Einsichten. Lassen Sie sich begeistern!
Claudio Marcos Krueger (3 years ago)
Tem um espaço com peças de Pomerode, SC. Muito bom ver a história dos nossos antepassados.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.