St. Nicholas Church

Greifswald, Germany

St. Nicholas Church (Greifswalder Dom St. Nikolai) is a Brick Gothic church located in the western part of the centre of Greifswald. The first written sources referring to a church dedicated to St. Nicholas in Greifswald are from 1263. The oldest extant parts of the church have been dated to the last third of the 13th century. In 1385 work was begun on a new choir with a straight eastern wall, which was finished in 1395.

In connection to the founding of the University of Greifswald, the church was raised to the status of collegiate church. The new status of the church also brought wealth, and in the same year construction began to make the tower higher. In the years 1480–1500, the octagonal upper part of the tower was built and with the addition of the also octagonal, c. 60 metres high Gothic spire at the beginning of the 16th century, the construction of the tower was finished. At the time, it reached a height of 120 metres.

The church lost its spire twice during severe storms. The first time was in 1515, when the top collapsed, apparently without causing any severe damage to the church building. It was not replaced until 1609. The collapse on 13 February 1650 initially destroyed the roof of the church, causing several of the vaults of the nave and southern aisle to collapse, and a few days later, the eastern wall of the church also collapsed. The interior furnishings of the church were completely destroyed. Immediately after the collapse, the council of the city called for donations for the reconstruction of the church.  In 1651 the vaults and roof were rebuilt, and one year later the church tower received its new, Baroque spire.

The interior of the church was thoroughly renewed in 1823–1832.

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Details

Founded: c. 1263
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Karp (16 months ago)
Eine sehr schöne Kirche. Kann man immer besichtigen. Am meisten freue ich mich auf den 24.12.
Brylyant Danels Anakottapary (17 months ago)
so good, really miss this place
Michal Gazovic (18 months ago)
Beautiful ghotic dome in the center of Greifswald city. Built of bricks together with other buildings in the city is a spectacular sightseeing spot of the ghotic brick architecture in Germany.
Jacob N (2 years ago)
A beautiful church with a lot of history for the town. Definitely make your way up to the tower if you can. It's a bit of a climb, but the journey is so interesting. Winding staircases, old brick walls and metal rails, time windows along the way, the bells in the tower, and an incredible view over the city once you reach the top. I think I will do it again sometime. So cool!
Yasas Perera (2 years ago)
Old yet recently renovated place. Can climb the tower, outside can be seen. Very beautiful. You may need to buy a ticket for 3 euro. For children and students there is a 1.50 discount.
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