Csesznek Castle Ruins

Csesznek, Hungary

Csesznek castle was built around 1263 by the Jakab Cseszneky who was the swordbearer of the King Béla IV. He and his descendants have been named after the castle Cseszneky. Between 1326 and 1392 it was a royal castle, when King Sigismund offered it to the House of Garai in lieu of the Macsó Banate. In 1482 the male line of the Garai family died out, and King Matthias Corvinus donated the castle to the Szapolyai family. In 1527, Baron Bálint Török became its owner.

During the 16th century the Csábi, Szelestey and Wathay families were in possession of Csesznek. In 1561, Lőrinc Wathay repulsed successfully the siege of the Ottomans. However, in 1594 the castle was occupied by Turkish troops, but in 1598 the Hungarians recaptured it.

In 1635, Dániel Esterházy bought the castle and village and from that time on Csesznek was the property of the Esterházy family until 1945.

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Details

Founded: 1263
Category: Ruins in Hungary

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eszter Ambrus (12 months ago)
Not a lot of planned activities to do, but the castle itself is nicely preserved and there is a short exhibition about its history as well.
József Stépán (14 months ago)
Very impressive Castle. Renovations are in progress, but can be visited nevertheless. There is a small exhibition, new toilets, and a souvenir penny press... The Castle itself is on top of a high hill, and the views are magnificent. If the skies are clear you can see very far away. Will visit back in a couple of years, when the restoration/renovation is done.
Ar Tur (15 months ago)
Bridge between towers is closed. Castle is worth to visit. Few minutes walk from parking so it's good for small kids too.
Jonathan Torre (16 months ago)
This castle is special because so many of the exterior walls are in-place. It is easy to imagine how the once illy function castle filled the skyline
Kei Izawa (17 months ago)
The pastoral view from the castle is so peaceful but the castle has origins that necessitated it's construction. It is a beautiful setting. Needs final touches of maintenance but it is a beautiful place to go.
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