Pécs Cathedral

Pécs, Hungary

Pécs Cathedral has been a prominent feature of this Hungarian cityscape for centuries. In 1064, after a fire destroyed a Romanesque basilica, the King of Hungary, Peter Orseolo, initiated construction of Pécs Cathedral where the old church had stood. Completed in the twelfth century, it features Romanesque stone carvings of exceptional artistic value. In the 16th century, Turkish conquerors converted it into a mosque.

The Hungarians, who regained control of the city in 1686, altered the building in the course of its return to a site of Christian worship. From 1806 to 1813, Mihaly Pollack, a master Hungarian architect, remodeled the building in the Gothic Revival style but did not address structural problems that had accrued due to the many changes to the building in the preceding centuries.

By the late 19th century, much of the building was in critical need of structural repairs. From 1882 through 1891 architect Friedrich von Schmidt oversaw a restoration project that essentially leveled the building to its foundations and rebuilt it in a neo-Romanesque style. In 1990, Pope John Paul II’s visit to the cathedral was an occasion to draw new attention to the historic importance of the structure.

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Address

Dóm tér 23, Pécs, Hungary
See all sites in Pécs

Details

Founded: 1064
Category: Religious sites in Hungary

More Information

www.wmf.org
www.iranypecs.hu

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomislav Zubović (18 months ago)
Excellent views to city from 70 meters high bell tower, beautiful very old Cathedral
Ирина Голубцова (19 months ago)
This place surely worth to be visited. There are magnificient frescoes inside the cathedral; the whole decoration inside is so elegant, that it's hard to leave the place. Nearby territory is full of ancient relicts, presented by means of modern services. You may see Ferenz List right in front of the Cathedrale's wall. In metall))
BlackR65 (2 years ago)
Absolutely beatiful church i would even say the most tremendous of the churches I visited so far in Hungary better than the ones in Budapest, Esztergom, Tihany and anywhere else in Western Hungary
Vik D. (2 years ago)
Beautiful view from top and nice inside Don't think there should be an entrance fee Maybe for the view to go up but not to enter
Richarf Edwards (2 years ago)
Having visited this years ago the outside is under restoration, but entry to cathedral was free I am disgusted that the Church charges for entry. Did not Jesus throw out the pedlars from the temple. I find it hard to pray and pay.
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