All Saints Church

Pécs, Hungary

All Saints Church is surrounded by a castle-wall-type barrier - by the wall of the former cemetery. The residents of the valley of the Tettye river built a one-navy church here as early as the 13th century. The originally Romanesque style All Saints Church was reconstructed in the 15th century in Gothic style. The exterior is simple, while a short tower stands on the triangular pediment of the main façade. The interior is mostly 18th century Baroques style. During the Turkish occupation this was the only church that still belonged to the Christians. It was used jointly by Catholics, Calvinists and Unitarians. This is where the famous religious dispute of the Calvinist Máté Skaricza and the Unitarian György Válaszúti took place in 1588.

The church became Unitarian by the mid-17th century, the Catholics only managed to regain it in 1664. Following this period, it was under Jesuit management until 1704. At this time it was reconstructed to be a three-nave church, this is when the little tower was added. On the south side of the cemetery, protected by stone wall, 18th-19th century graves, on the north, Baroques graves can be found.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Hungary

More Information

www.budapest.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ysuzg Gzusy (2 years ago)
Kicsi hangulatos templom a belváros közelében.
Csaba Pozsárkó (2 years ago)
Ez a - középkori városfalon kívül eső - kis templom volt az egyetlen Pécsett a török korban, ahol keresztény istentiszteletet lehetett tartani. Minden felekezet ezt használta. A törökök kiűzése után - rövid ideig - a székesegyház funkcióját is ellátta. Mára az egyetlen templomunk, amely részben (a gótikus szentélye) eredeti, középkori formájában megmaradt.
Jeff Photographer (3 years ago)
Jó fekvésű templom.
Tamas Kollmann (3 years ago)
Csodalatos panorama es kozel a tettyei romok is.
Teodor Hanzel (4 years ago)
Szép kis templom, kiváló kilátás a városra, kellemes sétakörnyék
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