Bishop’s Palace

Pécs, Hungary

King St. Stephen established a bishopric of Pécs in 1009. The origins of the Bishop's Palace reach back to the 12th century. First it was inhabited by the French Bishop Bonipert and later on by the Hungarian Bishop Mor. Just like the cathedral, the palace is a piece of stylistic history. The Gothic windows and Roman layout are hidden by the Neo-Renaissance facade. Preserved in the smokery is the wooden tobacco-pipe of the priest of Ibafa. Exhibitions about the lives of Bishops and of the interiors of the Bishop’s Palace will soon be open to the general public. The inner garden and the secret, underground hallway connecting the garden with the Bishop’s Cellar will be open to visitors as well.

On the eastern side of the Cathedral we can find the Classicist, late Baroque building of the Capitular Archives and the Parish, built during the time of Bishop Klimo. It was built based on the plans of the famous architect Sartory. Besides prebendary rooms it contains capitular archives, precious document of the cathedral archives, a drawings collection and the parish heritage records. The forged gate of the Bishop’s Crypt, built under the Archives in 1747, is an elaborate piece of art. The neighboring Dom lapidary is one of the most important statue collections of the art of Medieval Hungary: the original Roman-age sculptures, sculpture fragments and reliefs decorated with biblical scenes are all kept here.

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Address

Dóm tér 23, Pécs, Hungary
See all sites in Pécs

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Hungary

More Information

www.iranypecs.hu

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