Goluchów Castle

Gołuchów, Poland

The history of the Gołuchów castle goes back to the Middle Ages and its first known owner was ¯egota of Gołuchów  (1263-1282). A defensive fort stood here in the first half of the 15th century, probably where the castle stands today. The terrain definitely provides for adequate defence. It overlooks the Trzemsza River from the west and is surrounded by a moat and a secure embankment.

The Gołuchów estates became the property of the Leszczyñski family in 1507. The work on the residence, which had progressed in stages from the early 16th century, was completed between 1600 and 1628. This was now one of the most magnificent renaissance castles in Poland. A graphic recreation of its appearance back then was made possible by 18th-century surveys and inventory measurements from 1850.

The castle consisted of a tower house with four octagonal towers in the corners, closing the premises from the north. The basement and three keeps (reconstructed during the 19th century) have been preserved. It may have been erected prior to 1507. There used to be another building on the southern side. The two wings, which centred around a small interior courtyard with an arcaded cloister, were joined by built-on porches. The sandstone door frames, main entrance portal and marble and stone chimney housings have survived from those days. There are accounts of richly carved doors, decorated floors and polychromed and carved ceilings.

The estate changed hands frequently from the end of the 17th century until the middle of the 19th. Jan Działyński, son of the owner of Kórnik, purchased Gołuchów in 1853 and set about improving the economy of Gołuchów and beautifying the park in front of the castle. Only necessary repairs were made to the residence itself.

The plans to restore the castle were worked out by the leading French architect and conservator Eugène Viollet-le-Duc in the 19th century. Work began on the castle in 1876 and continued for 10 years.

The castle has been part of the National Museum in Poznañ since 1952. The expansive 150 ha park, together with the remaining buildings, was acquired by the State Forests National Forest Holding, which opened a Forest Culture Centre here in 1974. The entire complex is now open to the public.

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Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Glenn Standish (13 months ago)
A beautiful place in outstanding grounds. However, the entrance procedure is currently a real hassle. Yes, I understand that they are not letting any more than 10 people in at a time due to Covid. But to expect us to wait for an hour outside is unacceptable. They should introduce an online ticketing system. As it is we completely wasted unnecessary time waiting and as a result our plans for the rest of the day were ruined. Still it's worth a visit. They just need to improve their ticketing system...and hopefully after reading this, they will.
Mika the Raccoon (13 months ago)
Just like Hogwarts
Aleksandra :3 (15 months ago)
Very beautiful and peaceful place to spend your free time with family and dogs :D
Matt Garbacz (15 months ago)
Nice place, excellent for taking some rest outside the town
Sean Collins (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to go hiking. Clean and dog friendly. I only saw the castle from the outside, but the grounds were impeccable. As a plus, you can see wild buffalo (bison?) here. Highly recommend!
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