Goluchów Castle

Gołuchów, Poland

The history of the Gołuchów castle goes back to the Middle Ages and its first known owner was ¯egota of Gołuchów  (1263-1282). A defensive fort stood here in the first half of the 15th century, probably where the castle stands today. The terrain definitely provides for adequate defence. It overlooks the Trzemsza River from the west and is surrounded by a moat and a secure embankment.

The Gołuchów estates became the property of the Leszczyñski family in 1507. The work on the residence, which had progressed in stages from the early 16th century, was completed between 1600 and 1628. This was now one of the most magnificent renaissance castles in Poland. A graphic recreation of its appearance back then was made possible by 18th-century surveys and inventory measurements from 1850.

The castle consisted of a tower house with four octagonal towers in the corners, closing the premises from the north. The basement and three keeps (reconstructed during the 19th century) have been preserved. It may have been erected prior to 1507. There used to be another building on the southern side. The two wings, which centred around a small interior courtyard with an arcaded cloister, were joined by built-on porches. The sandstone door frames, main entrance portal and marble and stone chimney housings have survived from those days. There are accounts of richly carved doors, decorated floors and polychromed and carved ceilings.

The estate changed hands frequently from the end of the 17th century until the middle of the 19th. Jan Działyński, son of the owner of Kórnik, purchased Gołuchów in 1853 and set about improving the economy of Gołuchów and beautifying the park in front of the castle. Only necessary repairs were made to the residence itself.

The plans to restore the castle were worked out by the leading French architect and conservator Eugène Viollet-le-Duc in the 19th century. Work began on the castle in 1876 and continued for 10 years.

The castle has been part of the National Museum in Poznañ since 1952. The expansive 150 ha park, together with the remaining buildings, was acquired by the State Forests National Forest Holding, which opened a Forest Culture Centre here in 1974. The entire complex is now open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dawid S. Bodlaj (2 years ago)
Gołuchów Castle is the place, created for the next Generations. A real part of the polish history.
marcelbird film&photography (2 years ago)
One of the finest nicest castles in Poland and the huge garden around to get lost and connect with the mother nature. I'm coming back next month to walk more
Koos Reitsma (2 years ago)
Interesting small castle, that's worth the trip. From the outside it looks nice, from the inside even beter. Rooms are renovated, looking good. Some have interesting ceilings, others are decorated with Nice wallpapers, all matching together. A few times there is a Nice looking-through-open-door-corridors view. Entrance is Evert half hour, guided. Afterwards it is worth strolling through the big park.
Magdalena Cwik (2 years ago)
Nice big castle,interior really good preserved,particularly staircase,nearby museum of forestry.Big garden with Bison park on other end.Museum cafe great for ice cream desert
stephaniebalazs (2 years ago)
Beautiful grounds. Wish the castle tour had an English option
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