Jarocin Castle

Jarocin, Poland

A defensive brick building in Jarocin, defined in a 1496 document as a fortalitium, had presumably already been erected by the beginning of the 15th century. This building was then rebuilt, extended and eventually demolished. The building known locally as skarbczyk (the jewel box) is all that remains of it today. A lot of decorative fragments of Gothic furnace tiles, attesting a once opulent castle interior, have been uncovered here during the course of excavation work.

There is a two-storey brick and plaster building laid out on a rectangular plan and surrounded by what used to be moats by the pond in the southern part of the park. The domed turret adjoining the body of the building from the west was added a good while later. The main body has a tiled pitched roof. The walls are supported by strong corner abutments and framed rectangular window openings. A stone bas-relief of the Leszczyc coat of arms of the Radoliński family hangs above the portal on the tower elevation. The vaulted rooms inside have been preserved.

It is now the Jarocin branch of the Regional Museum.

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Poznańska 1A, Jarocin, Poland
See all sites in Jarocin

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

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regionwielkopolska.pl

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