Church of Saint Apostles Peter and Paul

Krotoszyn, Poland

Discalced Trinitarians were brought in to Krotoszyn in 1731 by Józef Potocki, the Voivod of Kiev, the then-owner of the town. 1733 saw erection of a cloister building; in 1766–1772, a brick temple was constructed on the site of a previously demolished wooden church. The edifice’s founder was Ludwika Potocka, nee Mniszech; the church building was probably designed by Karol-Marcin Frantz. The Prussian authorities abolished the cloister in 1819. Today, the building houses, inter alia, an art gallery and a Regional Museum, featuring an interesting exhibition illustrating the history of the town. The temple functions as a parish church.

The baroque single-nave church of Saint Apostles Peter and Paul is an edifice of a diversified solid, with rounded quoins. It is covered by a multi-hipped roof, with an ave-bell on the ridge. Adjacent to the nave at the west is a tower topped with a cupola featuring a lantern. The interior’s uniform late-baroque outfit dates to 1772–1775. A boat-shaped pulpit is an attractive feature.

The former cloister’s standalone storied building is founded on a rectangular projection. Covered by a three-hipped roof, it has in its western elevation an arcade portal dated ca. 1733. The interiors are covered by a.o. cloister vaults with lunettes; a beam ceiling survives in the vestibule.

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Rynek 1A, Krotoszyn, Poland
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Founded: 1733-1772
Category: Religious sites in Poland

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regionwielkopolska.pl

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Piotr Horyza (3 years ago)
Parafia rzymskokatolicka św.Piotra i Pawła jest gruntownie restaurowana, poprzednio wewnątrz, ołtarz główny, ambona, obrazy przy bocznych ołtarzach.Obecnie proboszcz ksiądz Darek zajął się stroną zewnętrzną, fundamenty, przyziemie.Chwała dobremu ,,gospodarzowi,,.
Krytykowy Sczekacz (4 years ago)
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