Dębno Castle is a late Gothic complex, built in 1470 - 1480 by Chancellor of the Crown and Kasztelan of Kraków, Jakub Dębiński. Before stone castle was built, a complex made of wood and earth had existed on the location. It probably belonged to komes Świętoslaw of the noble Gryfita family, Kasztelan of Wiślica. Some time in the mid-14th century, Dębno passed into the hands of the influential Odrowąż family, to which Jakub z Dębna, founder of the castle, belonged. In 1586 the castle was rebuilt in Renaissance style, and at that time it belonged to a Hungarian nobleman Ferenc Wesselini, secretary of King Stephen Báthory. In the late 18th century, another remodeling took place, ordered by the Tarło family, who were then-owners of the castle. Tarło coat of arms and the date 1772 can still be seenon baroque portal. Also, at that time, a part of the northern wing of the castle was added.

Throughout the years, Dębno castle changed hands several times. It belonged to a number of noble Polish families - Lanckoroński, Rogawski, Rudnicki, Spławski (who in 1831 hosted there refugees of the November Uprising), Jastrzębski. Even though owners carried out numerous remodeling projects, the castle did not change its original look. It today consists of four rectangular segments, which make an internal, rectangular courtyard with a well. The gate goes through a Baroque portal. Lavlishly furnished rooms on upper floors were occupied by owners, while domestic workers lived on ground floor. The castle used to be surrounded by a moat, now, there is a permanent wooden bridge leading to the gate.

In 1945, the castle was taken over by the government of Poland, and between 1970–1978, it was renovated. Since 1978, Dębno castle has been home to a branch of Tarnów Regional Museum.

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Dębno 189, Dębno, Poland
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Founded: 1470-1480
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

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