St. Paraskevi Church

Kwiatoń, Poland

St. Paraskevi Church is wooden church located in the village of Kwiatoń from the nineteenth-century, which together with different tserkvas is designated as part of the UNESCO Wooden tserkvas of the Carpathian region in Poland and Ukraine.

The tserkov was built in the second half of the seventeenth-century. The date of the completion of the tserkov was dated at 1700. The tower was built in 1743. The date for the completion of the tserkov was found on one of its wooden framework columns. However, this date could relate to the renovation of the old tower. The tserkov's tower is considered to be the oldest tower built in the Lemko church architectural style. After Operation Vistula, the tserkov was transformed into a Roman Catholic church, belonging to the Uście Gorlickie parish.

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Kwiatoń, Poland
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Details

Founded: 1700
Category: Religious sites in Poland

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Witold Puchala (4 years ago)
Place to understand
Witold Puchala (4 years ago)
Place to understand
Łukasz S. (4 years ago)
Beautifull Orthodox church which is on the list UNESCO. If you're interested in sacred topics is worth to see.
Łukasz S. (4 years ago)
Beautifull Orthodox church which is on the list UNESCO. If you're interested in sacred topics is worth to see.
Pawel Jezierski (4 years ago)
Beautiful old orthodox church, can visit inside and get a free tour during the day
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