Archangel Michael Church

Dębno, Poland

The wooden church of the Archangel Michael in Debno is first mentioned in 1335. The present building, the second on the site, dates from the late 15th century. This church has a unique example of medieval decorations. The ceiling and the interior walls are painted using stencils from the 15th and 16th centuries. The decoration contains more than 77 motifs: architectural recalling Gothic forms, animal, human and religious.

The church is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Wooden Churches of Southern Lesser Poland and Subcarpathia. The wooden churches of southern Little Poland represent outstanding examples of the different aspects of medieval church-building traditions in Roman Catholic culture.

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Address

Kościelna 39, Dębno, Poland
See all sites in Dębno

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mariusz Folta (2 years ago)
Must see this place.
Andrea Takacova (2 years ago)
Realy nice church
Desmond P (2 years ago)
Tiny church but what a beautiful building. Over 800 years old it's amazing really must see. Surrounding views are also great!
Carlos Eduardo Menezes de Rezende (2 years ago)
Well preserved wooden church from XV Century.
Arthur Kaiser (3 years ago)
So first of all I waited about half an hour to get in this "Church" there were so many people it was just incredible... And then it looked so average nothing special.. it looked like a old church. These positive ratings here are so wrong cannot understand why someone should give this a good rating. In my view its just a cheap way to waste some time for the Tour guides. Do Not recommend!
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