Auschwitz Concentration Camp

Oświęcim, Poland

Auschwitz concentration camp was a network of German Nazi concentration camps and extermination camps built and operated by the Third Reich in Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany during World War II. It consisted of Auschwitz I (the original camp), Auschwitz II–Birkenau (a combination concentration/extermination camp), Auschwitz III–Monowitz (a labor camp to staff an IG Farben factory), and 45 satellite camps.

Auschwitz I was first constructed to hold Polish political prisoners, who began to arrive in May 1940. The first extermination of prisoners took place in September 1941, and Auschwitz II–Birkenau went on to become a major site of the Nazi 'Final Solution to the Jewish question'. From early 1942 until late 1944, transport trains delivered Jews to the camp's gas chambers from all over German-occupied Europe, where they were killed with the pesticide Zyklon B. At least 1.1 million prisoners died at Auschwitz, around 90 percent of them Jewish; approximately 1 in 6 Jews killed in the Holocaust died at the camp. Others deported to Auschwitz included 150,000 Poles, 23,000 Romani and Sinti, 15,000 Soviet prisoners of war, 400 Jehovah's Witnesses, homosexuals, and tens of thousands of people of diverse nationalities. Many of those not killed in the gas chambers died of starvation, forced labor, infectious diseases, individual executions, and medical experiments.

In the course of the war, the camp was staffed by 7,000 members of the German Schutzstaffel (SS), approximately 12 percent of whom were later convicted of war crimes. Some, including camp commandant Rudolf Höss, were executed. The Allied Powers refused to believe early reports of the atrocities at the camp, and their failure to bomb the camp or its railways remains controversial. One hundred forty-four prisoners are known to have escaped from Auschwitz successfully, and on October 7, 1944, two Sonderkommando units—prisoners assigned to staff the gas chambers—launched a brief, unsuccessful uprising.

As Soviet troops approached Auschwitz in January 1945, most of its population was evacuated and sent on a death march. The prisoners remaining at the camp were liberated on January 27, 1945, a day now commemorated as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. In the following decades, survivors, such as Primo Levi, Viktor Frankl, and Elie Wiesel, wrote memoirs of their experiences in Auschwitz, and the camp became a dominant symbol of the Holocaust. In 1947, Poland founded a museum on the site of Auschwitz I and II, and in 1979, it was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Oświęcim, Poland
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Founded: 1940
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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dana Salykbayeva (9 months ago)
An experience everybody must go through. I was on the verge of tears. Definitely book a tour guide online, it is easier and makes your trip much comfortable.
Miranda De Keijzer (13 months ago)
Very impressive. Buying cards on line seems handy, but we didn't get them via the mail after payment .at the museum we had to wait for more then 1 hour to have them printed, so we were 5 minutes late....but it was worth it.
ermes tuon (ErmesT) (13 months ago)
A place to visit, once in the life. I did it twice, and I will probably do it again, because we all need to remember, and time by time we need to refresh our memories. I suggest a visit to all the students, even if in some way it can be an uncomfortable visit, or maybe exactly for this reason. The experience is unforgettable You need to book an online ticket. The access is free, but they want to avoid overflow of people. When you enter, be respectful of the place. It is a place where thousands of people were suffering, we need to remember where we are
Dion Mierden (14 months ago)
Impressive. The guide said. Now there are 4 times less people than before the pandemic. Please book a guide. You will learn so much more.
Miha Vardijan (2 years ago)
Very good guided tour. It is worth a visit, because only in this way can one be aware that this must never happen again. After the viewing, you stay pensive all day, because you can't believe that a human could have done that to a fellow human being.
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