Ogrodzieniec Castle Ruins

Podzamcze, Poland

Ogrodzieniec Castle is a ruined medieval castle originally built in the 14th–15th century by the W³odkowie Sulimczycy family. Established in the early 12th century, during the reign of Boles³aw III Wrymouth, the first stronghold was razed by the Tatars in 1241. In the mid-14th century a new gothic castle was built here to accommodate the Sulimczycy family. Surrounded by three high rocks, the castle was well integrated into the area. The defensive walls were built to close the circuit formed by the rocks, and a narrow opening between two of the rocks served as an entrance.

In 1470 the castle and lands were bought by the wealthy Cracovian townsmen, Ibram and Piotr Salomon. Then, Ogrodzieniec became the property of Jan Feliks Rzeszowski, the rector of Przemy¶l and the canon of Cracow. The owners of the castle about that time were also Jan and Andrzej Rzeszowskis, and later Pilecki and Che³miñski families. In 1523 the castle was bought by Jan Boner. After his death, the castle passed to his nephew, Seweryn Boner, who replaced the medieval stronghold with a renaissance castle in 1530–1545.

In 1562 the castle became the property of the Great Marshal of the Crown Jan Firlej, as a result of his marriage with Zofia- the daughter of Seweryn Boner. Later on, in 1587, the castle was captured by the arms of the Austrian archduke Maximilian III, the rejected candidate to the Polish-Lithuanian throne. In 1655, it was partly burnt by the Swedish troops, who -deployed here for almost two years- destroyed the buildings considerably. From 1669 on, the castle belonged to Stanis³aw Warszycki, the Cracow"s castellan, who managed to partly rebuild the castle after the Swedish devastations.

About 1695 the castle changed hands once again becoming the property of the Mêciñski family. Seven years later, in 1702, over a half of the castle had burnt down in the fire set by the Swedish troops of Charles XII. After the fire, it was never to be rebuilt. About 1784 the castle was purchased by Tomasz Jakliñski, who did not care for its condition. Consequently, the last tenants left the devastated castle about 1810. The next owner of the Ogrodzieniec Castle was Ludwik Koz³owski, who used the remains of the castle as a source of building material and sold out the castle"s equipment to the Jewish merchants.

The last proprietor of the castle was the neighbouring Wo³oczyñski family. After the Second World War, the castle was nationalized. The works aimed at preserving the ruins and opening them to the visitors were started in 1949 and finished in 1973.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Ruins in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomer Grinberg (3 years ago)
very impresive castel with lovely soroundings. when we visited there was a nice market there and lots of activities for children...perhaps because it was sunday?
Pow dodo (4 years ago)
Burnt down twice by Swedish, I think it’s restauration calls for some Swedish contributions. It’s a very imposing castle, actually the biggest and best restored one on the so called “castle route” if Silesia. 12 zlotys for admission.
Dominika Nizinska Piltz (4 years ago)
Great place if you like history and castles. My kids were very happy
Dheeraj Krishna (4 years ago)
One of the finest castle closest to Katowice. I loved the view and the maintenance of the castle. You do not need a guide here because you get all the details on the spot both in English and Polish. I enjoyed my trip here. Hope everybody likes it.
Barbara Sargent (4 years ago)
Very lovely place to spend the day out with the family. Lots of lovely restaurants and small souvenir shops. Car parks probably in every household in the village so there is no problem where to leave your car.
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