Dargun Abbey Ruins

Dargun, Germany

Dargun Abbey was originally a Cistercian monastery, converted after its dissolution into a palace. The monastery was founded here in 1172 on the site of a former heathen temple after the conquest of the region by Christian forces in 1164. The founding community came from Esrum Abbey in Denmark. The monastery was destroyed in 1198, and the monks left, later to found another monastery at Eldena. Dargun was re-established in 1208 by monks from Doberan Abbey, which is therefore counted as its mother house.

It was secularised in 1552 and taken over as a residence by Duke Ulrich I of Mecklenburg-Güstrow in 1556, who converted it into a Renaissance palace, which, after the extinction of the line of Mecklenburg-Güstrow, passed to the Dukes of Mecklenburg-Schwerin.

The monastery was brick-built. The principal building complex was reconstructed in the 14th century. The Gothic abbey church was built between 1225 and 1270, with further work to the choir in 1464. The church is now ruined but parts of the choir, nave and transept remain.

In 1637 the palace burnt down and was rebuilt until 1654. Until the mid-18th century it served as the home of the widows of the princely house of Mecklenburg-Güstrow. It was re-converted in the 19th century under Georg Adolf Demmler, and burnt down at the end of World War II. Little was done to secure the ruins until 1991. From 1994 some reconstruction and repair has taken place. The buildings presently accommodate an information bureau and the town library.

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Schloß, Dargun, Germany
See all sites in Dargun

Details

Founded: 1172
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

G. R. (5 months ago)
War von außen schön. Seltsame Öffnungszeiten. Am Wochenende erwarte ich eigentlich dass sowas auf hat. Schließlich kommen doch die meisten Touristen am Wochenende
Holger Behrens (7 months ago)
Das Kloster das teilweise wieder aufgebaut wurde und dann die alten Klosterruinen geben ein phantastisches Zusammenspiel. Es hat schon einen gewissen Zauber der auf einen einwirkt. Gerade in der Nebensaison kann ich einen Rundgang empfehlen und alles auf sich einwirken lassen. Auf keinen Fall den Fotoapperat vergessen.
Aaron Shuler (12 months ago)
My Great Great grandparents were married here in the mid 1800's so when we went to Europe, I made a special trip to Dargun to see the palace. We had a wonderful time. There is a visitors shop on the second floor and they offered a guided tour for 2 Euro a person. The nice lady who gave the tour offered to take us up in a tower and both my daughter and I went up the spiral stair to the top. What a fantastic view!
Claudia Pollok (18 months ago)
I recommend visiting the Christmas market they have here every year!
Jens Hinrichs (2 years ago)
Tolle location
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