Dobbertin Abbey is a former Benedictine monastery of monks, afterwards housed a community of nuns, and later still a women's collegiate foundation. The abbey was founded during the Christianisation of Germany in about 1220 by Prince Heinrich Borwin II of Mecklenburg and was the first field monastery in Mecklenburg. The founder gave it to the Benedictines for a community of monks. 15 years later it was turned into a Benedictine nunnery.

In 1549 the Landtag at Sagsdorf Bridge near Sternberg resolved to introduce the Lutheran Reformation into Mecklenburg. Despite violent resistance the abbey was secularised and in 1572 converted into a Lutheran collegiate foundation for noblewomen.

In the middle of the 19th century the church was restored by Georg Adolf Demmler to plans by Karl Friedrich Schinkel. The work was completed in 1857.

In 1918 the abbey premises became the property of the state and were converted into a youth hostel. After World War II Soviet troops were stationed here, and destroyed much of historical interest.

From 1947 to 1991 the buildings were used as an old people's residential and care home. Then they were transferred to the responsibility of the charitable organisation of the German Evangelical Church, who set up a care home for the severely physically handicapped.

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Details

Founded: 1220
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Frank Melzer (2 months ago)
Tolle Anlage mit schönem Café, Besuch ist lohnenswert
Ralph Hirt (3 months ago)
Sehr erholsam. Nettes Restaurant. Viel Wasser.
Detlef Kuhnt (4 months ago)
Adventsmarkt mit sehr viel Liebe und ganz vielen Menschen Das muss ein Fehler sein. Bei mir leuchteten 5 Sterne
Herbert Goerbert (4 months ago)
Weihnachtsmarkt am 01.12.2018. In diesem Jahr wurden alle Erwartungen übertroffen. Das sehr gute Wetter lockte unzählige Besucher an. Highlight war der Auftritt des Chores vom Parchimer Gymnasium. Auch der Weihnachtsmann drehte seine Runden.
Joachim Bierlein (6 months ago)
Es wurde längst alles über diesen wunderschönen Ort gesagt - einfach dasein und genießen ! Die Gastronomie hat noch Verbesserungspotential, bei meinem Schnitzel wollte die Panade unbedingt weg
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