Güstrow Palace

Güstrow, Germany

Güstrow Palace is a Renaissance-era palatial schlossb built in 1558 for Ulrich, Duke of Mecklenburg. The palace features stucco decorations and a Baroque-classicist gatehouse.

Construction of the present palace was initiated in 1558 by Ulrich, Duke of Mecklenburg, in place of a medieval castle. Franciscus Pahr was the master builder who constructed the additional south and west wings in a fusion of Italian, French, and German architectural styles, unique for the time and area.

In 1657, Gustav Adolf, the last Duke of Güstrow, engaged Charles Philippe Dieussart to refurbish parts of his palace in modern style. The Baroque gatehouse and the palace bridge were built during this time. After the end of ducal control, between 1817 and 1950, the palace became the farm house of Mecklenburg workers. Further restoration took place from 1963 to 1978, when the palace was restored to its original grandeur.

Güstrow Palace is quadrangular in shape. Some of the old furniture has been removed to Schwerin and other places following the death of Magdalena Sybilla which marked the end of the Güstrow lineage. In one part of the palace, there are well preserved Flemish paintings; one particular painting is of a Dutchman smoking. A theatre is in good shape with well preserved original stucco paintings. The stucco ceilings are retained in their original form in the palace. The banquet hall's ceiling has unique stucco paintings of hunting scenes which are adaptations from Dutch copper engravings. The medieval rooms in the basement of the palace, which are vaulted, have many artifacts of the medieval period of Germany. The art chamber contains exhibits of hunting and ceremonial weapons. The refurbished former dining halls, residential and reception rooms have exhibits of paintings of Cranach, Marten de Vos, and Tintoretto. Antique ceramic vessels and a large number of glass items are on display in the former chamber of the duchess. There are also displays from the 19th to 21st centuries.

The grounds contain stables and a well-tended garden. The garden has been redone with beds of lavender and walkways.

The palace houses a museum related to the male line of Duchess Elisabeth Sophie of Mecklenburg's family, presenting also art exhibitions and concerts.

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Details

Founded: 1558
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adela Alabama (11 months ago)
Beautiful town
Mike Whitla (12 months ago)
A beautiful building but for the admission price I expected a bit more. All explanations were all in German. No audio guides were available. What was on display was not that impressive. Better to look at the gardens and building for free which is possible.
Elani Koogle (13 months ago)
If you’ve seen more than a handful of castles, this one won’t blow you away, but it’s pretty, has a good collection of art and artifacts, and is not at all crowded. Certainly worth a visit if you’re in the area. 6.50 EUR entry price is very fair considering how extensive the collection is.
Mohamed Nabil Ahmed (15 months ago)
Historical Museum is impressive .. City museum close by is free
Daniel Egerter (16 months ago)
Nice museum with a collection of artifacts from the Middle Ages. Although the exterior is beautiful, the Schloss interiorr is bare bones as it had not been used as a ducal residence in centuries
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