Abbey of the Holy Cross

Rostock, Germany

The Abbey of the Holy Cross in Rostock was founded in the 13th century by Cistercian nuns. It is the only completely preserved abbey in the city. The complex includes the former abbey church which is used today as the University Church (Universitätskirche). The remaining convent buildings house the Museum of Cultural History (Kulturhistorische Museum) for the city of Rostock.

The nunnery was founded by the Danish Queen Margaret in 1270. According to legend, she founded the nunnery in gratitude for a miraculous rescue at sea in the vicinity of Hundsburg castle at Schmarl. What is certain is that she made large donations to the nunnery. She died in 1282 and was buried in the minster church in Bad Doberan which belonged to the Cistercian Order. The nunnery gained extensive estates in Rostock and also in the whole of Mecklenburg as a result of donations, endowments and bequests. The nuns came mostly from wealthy families in Rostock. The nunnery was very popular and even had to place restrictions on entry in the 14th century. The abbey church was completed in 1360.

The Reformation was accepted into the abbey in 1562 after just thirty years of 'contemplation time' by the nuns in the convent. As a result of the Second Rostock Inheritance Agreement between the city of Rostock and the dukes of Mecklenburg in 1584 the nunnery was turned into a Lutheran damsels' convent (Frauenstift). The lives of its conventuals, however, hardly changed at all. The place still resembled a Roman Catholic monastic order. After the Thirty Years' War, however, there were only nine conventuals. In the 19th century, efforts were made to transfer the estate of the nunnery to the state. But it was not until 1920, when the Free State of Mecklenburg-Schwerin constitution was introduced, that the state appropriated all such parastatal entities, such as women's convents. As a result, Mecklenburg-Schwerin's Lutheran church was only allowed to continue legally as an organisation independent of the state. The effect of this was that the nunnery was expropriated by the state without any compensation to the church. On 17 August 1920, the abbey was dissolved, although the remaining conventuals were allowed the right to live there for life. The last abbess died in 1981. The abbey church was renovated both outside and, later, inside from 1997 to 2002. The convent buildings now house the Rostock Museum of Cultural History.

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Address

Klosterhof 6, Rostock, Germany
See all sites in Rostock

Details

Founded: 1270
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Levin Petter (15 months ago)
spannend
Ines Seyer (15 months ago)
Schöne Gaststätte sehr romantisch und auch sonst alles sehr sehenswert
Regina Wegner (15 months ago)
Immer wieder toll! Interessante Ausstellungen - oft interaktiv, so auch für Kinder (denke mit Anleitung Erwachsener ab 4 Jahre gut geeignet) Personal freundlich und hilfsbereit
Britta Lippmann (16 months ago)
Interessante Ausstellung über das älteste Gold, man kann sich auch selber testen.
Baerbel Schlimm (2 years ago)
Sehr gute Ausstellung
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