Checiny Castle Ruins

Chêciny, Poland

The Chêciny Royal Castle was built in the late 13th century. It is certain that the castle existed in 1306, when king W³adys³aw I gave it to the Archbishop of Kraków, Jan Muskata. A year later, under the pretext of detection of a plot against the royal power, the castle returned to the king. It played a significant role as a place of concentration of troops departing for war with the Teutonic Knights. After the death of W³adys³aw the stronghold was enlarged by Casimir III the Great. At that time Chêciny become a residence of the king"s second wife Adelaide of Hesse. In following years it was also a residence of Elisabeth of Poland, Queen of Hungary, Sophia of Halshany and her son W³adys³aw III of Varna and Bona Sforza. Later it was used for many years as a state prison. Among imprisoned here were Michael Küchmeister von Sternberg future Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights, Andrzej Wingold, Jogaila"s half-brother and Warcis³aw of Gotartowice.

In the second half of the 16th century, the castle began to decline. In 1588 the parliament ordered to transfer the castle"s inventories to the Chêciny Church and in 1607, during the Zebrzydowski Rebellion the fortifications and buildings were partially destroyed and burned. The castle briefly regained its former glory due to reconstruction initiated by Stanis³aw Branicki, starost of Chêciny, but in 1655-1657 it was almost completely destroyed by Swedish-Brandenburgian and Transylvanian troops. The destruction was completed in 1707 during another Swedish occupation. Then, the last residents left the castle. Over the next century the medieval walls become a source of building material for local villagers.

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Address

Radkowska 4, Chêciny, Poland
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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Troy D (12 months ago)
The castle is an amazing piece of history, views from the towers are spectacular. The staff was dressed in old world clothing, which took you back in time even for just a moment. There is a long walk from parking and up and down many stairs in the castle. So older handicap may not enjoy. But for all others it is well worth a day of fun. Make sure to exit out the castle not the way you came in. Out the back and down the hill are statues of all the past kings.
Kinga Królak (17 months ago)
Good place to visit with children. Nicely restored few years ago. There is camping under the castle hill. Nearby is a river were you can go kayaking.
Artur Oborski Park (17 months ago)
Renovated really nice. Interesting for smaller and bigger kids. Perfect size makes it easy to tour with children
Simon (21 months ago)
One of the more spectacular castles of this region because of its location on the top of a high peak. Poland’s policy of ’historic acuraccy’ keeps the castle a half-ruin, but nonetheless it’s worth taking a detour from the highway and walking a few stairs. Beautiful view, free parking.
Beata Jaworska-Varga (2 years ago)
Great place with lovely views. Good experience for children and adults. You can participate in a lot of games/activities.
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