Checiny Castle Ruins

Chêciny, Poland

The Chêciny Royal Castle was built in the late 13th century. It is certain that the castle existed in 1306, when king W³adys³aw I gave it to the Archbishop of Kraków, Jan Muskata. A year later, under the pretext of detection of a plot against the royal power, the castle returned to the king. It played a significant role as a place of concentration of troops departing for war with the Teutonic Knights. After the death of W³adys³aw the stronghold was enlarged by Casimir III the Great. At that time Chêciny become a residence of the king"s second wife Adelaide of Hesse. In following years it was also a residence of Elisabeth of Poland, Queen of Hungary, Sophia of Halshany and her son W³adys³aw III of Varna and Bona Sforza. Later it was used for many years as a state prison. Among imprisoned here were Michael Küchmeister von Sternberg future Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights, Andrzej Wingold, Jogaila"s half-brother and Warcis³aw of Gotartowice.

In the second half of the 16th century, the castle began to decline. In 1588 the parliament ordered to transfer the castle"s inventories to the Chêciny Church and in 1607, during the Zebrzydowski Rebellion the fortifications and buildings were partially destroyed and burned. The castle briefly regained its former glory due to reconstruction initiated by Stanis³aw Branicki, starost of Chêciny, but in 1655-1657 it was almost completely destroyed by Swedish-Brandenburgian and Transylvanian troops. The destruction was completed in 1707 during another Swedish occupation. Then, the last residents left the castle. Over the next century the medieval walls become a source of building material for local villagers.

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Address

Radkowska 4, Chêciny, Poland
See all sites in Chêciny

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Beata Jaworska-Varga (14 months ago)
Great place with lovely views. Good experience for children and adults. You can participate in a lot of games/activities.
Marcin Zaranski (14 months ago)
Easy to access from Kielce, partly restored, definitely nice to visit at night when it's all lit up. Unfortunately the exit from the motorway is not well marked so you have to pay attention to your gps on the way.
Lukasz (14 months ago)
Fantastic place both for parents and children. Many attractions, beautiful views and souvenirs
Piotr Fordymacki (VdF) (15 months ago)
Absolutely fantastic place to see. Beautiful view from the towers. Castle war revitalised. Most recommended.
Alastair Stewart (15 months ago)
Good castle, but it's a bit of a climb to get to the top. Not recommended if you don't like stairs. Was fun for the kids to see as well.
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