Książ Castle, the third largest castle in Poland, is located on a majestic rock cliff by the side of the Pelcznica River. Beautifully surrounded by the forest within a 315500 actre nature reserve, at the height of 395m above sea level, castle is often called ‘the Pearl of Lower Silesia’. Such location corresponding to the size of the building is very rare in Europe.

Książ (in German Fürstenstein) was built in 1288-1292 under Bolko I the Strict (Duke of Świdnica and Jawor) after the original fortification was destroyed in the year 1263 by Ottokar II of Bohemia. Duke Bolko II of Świdnica died in 1368 without having children with his wife Agnes von Habsburg. After her death in the year 1392 King Wenceslaus IV of Bohemia obtained the castle. In 1401 Janko from Chociemice obtained the castle.

The Bohemian Hussites occupied the castle between 1428-1429. In the year 1464 Birka from Nasiedla obtained the castle from the Bohemian crown. He sold it to Hans von Schellendorf. This second castle was destroyed in 1482 by Georg von Stein. In the year 1509 Konrad I von Hoberg obtained the castle hill. The Hochberg family owned the castle until the 1940s.

Jan Henryk XV carried the the biggest development in the Castle’s history. Between 1908 – 1923 north and west renaissance extensions were being developed. Castle’s tower has reached the height of 47m and was covered with the domed helmet and the lantern. Also the Castle’s gardens took its current shape.

The castle was seized by the Nazi government in 1944 because the Prince of Pless Hans Heinrich XVII had moved to England in 1932 and became a British citizen, also his brother Count Alexander of Hochberg who was a Polish citizen and the owner of Schloss Pleß (today Pszczyna Castle), had joined the Polish army. Fürstenstein castle was a part of the Project Riese (a construction project of Nazi Germany, consisting of seven underground structures located in the Owl Mountains) until 1945 when it was occupied by the Red army. All artifacts were stolen or destroyed.

Up to 1956 the castle was decaying the the restoration took place between 1956-1974.

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Details

Founded: 1288-1292
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tom Zychowski (20 months ago)
You have three hotels that include breakfast under a hundred dollars a night. Comparable in Germany cost fiver hundred Canadian dollars a night. There is plenty to explore and you are only a hop away from Prague or Wroclaw. Endless trails and sites. Staff was pleasant but English was not well spoken at the location, you might have to switch to German or Polish to communicate.
Ewa Pe (20 months ago)
I had only seen the castle from a backyard and I only had time to collect some leaflets, so I took three maps in various languages. It seems interesting that each of the maps was slightly different from the other two - different fonts, shades of the same colors. I would have missed this if I only got one version and I had not spent a while comparing all tree of them. From my point of view, I do not have enough data to evaluate well my visit, so I appreciate I was able to adore the view.
Alexander Altshuller (21 months ago)
Located in a Beautiful place. But what I didn't liked is if you don't know Poland language you won't understand much. So for myself I can't say much, felt a bit like waste of money but the place and the nature surrounding it is very beautiful
Marusya Manya (21 months ago)
I was expecting for mor details in the interior. Definitely the best time for visiting is not winter. But the castle itself is beautiful and has a rich history. I think every person who is interested in history should visit this beautiful place. And guide will tell what walls won’t. I hope to return here without children, because they started be boring in the middle of journey )) I have left many unread information there.
Maggie Niew (2 years ago)
Absolutely amazing. Last time l visited only the main room downstairs was available for sightseeing. Imagine my surprise when l walked through the castle and saw all these beautiful rooms. So many improvements, it was nice to see. Had fantastic dinner on the property also. Highly recommended
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