Swidnica Church of Peace

Świdnica, Poland

The Churches of Peace in Jawor and Świdnica, the largest timber-framed religious buildings in Europe, were built in the former Silesia in the mid-17th century, amid the religious strife that followed the Peace of Westphalia. Constrained by the physical and political conditions, the Churches of Peace bear testimony to the quest for religious freedom and are a rare expression of Lutheran ideology in an idiom generally associated with the Catholic Church.

The Church of the Holy Trinity in Świdnica was built in 1656–1657 as a three-aisled basilica with a Greek cross ground plan.

The church can accommodate 7500 people. The exquisite 18th century wooden altar dominates the Baroque interior. The relief above the altar stone shows the Last Supper. Above the relief stand sculpted figures of Moses, arch-priest Aaron, Jesus, John the Baptist and the apostles Peter and Paul. The central scene between the figures shows the baptism of Christ in the river Jordan. The altar is surmounted by a book with seven seals, a lamb and a banner.

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Details

Founded: 1656-1657
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ewe Beaut (9 months ago)
A state of art in beautiful surroundings. 'Barok' cafe is a must visit when you're there! Their hot chocolate and baroc tea are delicious!
db ls (10 months ago)
Surprising blend of European history merging with religion in a well loved building. Welcoming locals and interesting audio guide in English.
Nikhil Shah (11 months ago)
The peace church is very beautiful from inside. The work done is marvelous. This place is a must visit if you are in the nearby areas. The ticket of 10zl to enter the church is worth it.
Harriette Smith (11 months ago)
A breathtaking 17th Century church. Built completely of wood, with no nails, it is one of three churches built under the Peace of Westphalia. The inside is a wonderful example of Baroque architecture. Still used today as a parish church, it also regularly hosts concerts. An absolute must to visit if in Silesia.
Tomasz Dembski (12 months ago)
Very interesting... the churchyard accessible even when the church itself is closed. Closing time at 6:00 pm in the summer and 3:00 pm winter-time... Old German graveyard on the grounds.
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