Weinheim Castle

Weinheim, Germany

Weinheim Castle (Weinheimer Schloss) was built in the early 1400s by Rupert of the Palatinate. Louis III, also Elector Palatine, finished it to the current appearance in 1537. The castle tower were restored to the neo-Gothic style in 1868 by Baron Christian Friedrich Gustav von Berckheim.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

SHYAM SUNDAR.R (2 months ago)
A must visit place in Weinheim. It's a small hike up the hill to reach the castle. You have very clean WC available for free of cost and you have to pay 20 / 50 cents to walk up the tower to get a view of the town.
One Andy (6 months ago)
Typical Germany bar is closed when you want a beer DULL
Dorota Przybylska (6 months ago)
Excellent burg and restaurants
Justin Bunch (11 months ago)
Built to defend the monastery of Lorsch in the 12th century on land owned by someone else, the castle had a long history of conflict until it was blown up by the French. The ruins offer spectacular views of the Rhine valley, and is itself the most dramatic ruin on the Bergstraße. Worth a visit
Alan Koshy John (12 months ago)
A nice hike up the hill and you get a breast taking view of the nearby cities
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