St. George’s Church

Parchim, Germany

The parish church dedicated to St .George is mentioned for first time in historical sources dating 1229; the earliest church on the site was a Late Romanesque Brick Gothic basilica built without a steeple. In 1289, the basilica was largely destroyed in a fire. Thanks to contributions from the sale of papal indulgences, St. George's church was rebuilt as a Gothic four tiered hall church with three naves; it was consecrated anew in 1307. Around 1400, the hall choir was enlarged and a large hall-style ambulatory was installed. This set of renovations also saw the installation of two-storied, transept-style annexes in the northern and southern parts of the church adorned with ornamental gables. In 1612, the steeple top caught on fire and was replaced by a humble gabled roof.

The church's interior houses many valuable works of art. Amongst the most notable dating to the pre-Reformation epoch are a two-tiered convertable winged alter (ca. 1421), an oak sculpture depicted Jesus as a man of sorrows (1400) and a group of crosses representing Christ's triumph (1480). Valuable images and carvings dating to the Rennaissance include the church's pulpit (1580) and the alderman's bank (1608-23); equally valuable are a baptism font from 1620, with their large brass basins dating to the 15th century and a Friese-3 brand organ (1871). Extensive renovations of the church's interior were carried out in 1844 and 1898; the latter aimed to render visible once more the medieval form of the church's Brick Gothic walls.

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Details

Founded: 1307
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

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