Boitin Steintanz

Boitin, Germany

The Boitin Steintanz ('Stone Dance') is a very special monument to mankind’s early history. There are altogether four stone circles in the forest near the village of Boitin in the vicinity of Bützow. Three of them lie close together, the fourth one at a distance of about 200 metres. Already long ago there were theories about the age and function of the arrangement. Today it is assumed that this is a calendar from the 12th century before Christ.

A saga gives a different interpretation of the stone circles: The legend has it that a frolicsome wedding party celebrated here long ago. The party bowled with bread and sausages until a ghost, appearing as an old man, asked the boisterous group to end the game. However, the wedding party did not do what they had been asked. They scorned the old man instead. So he turned the bride, the groom and the guests into stones. A shepherd, who happened to be nearby, was to be spared. But in spite of his promise, he looked back out of curiosity when fleeing and therefore was also transformed into stone together with his sheep and dog.

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Boitin, Germany
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Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Schwarzer Kater Miau Miau (47 days ago)
So nice there
Stefanie Lindner (2 months ago)
Very nice to go for a walk.
sky haven (5 months ago)
Reached after a walk through the forest.
Camper HRO (8 months ago)
A mystical place.
Uschi M. (11 months ago)
Not only the stone circles are interesting and worth seeing but also the surroundings. The nature and this calm! It smells of forest and the birds are chirping. Even the way there, which can be described as a short hike, is worth a visit. In the overall impression, everything is a bit mystical. Really great!
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