Boitin Steintanz

Boitin, Germany

The Boitin Steintanz ('Stone Dance') is a very special monument to mankind’s early history. There are altogether four stone circles in the forest near the village of Boitin in the vicinity of Bützow. Three of them lie close together, the fourth one at a distance of about 200 metres. Already long ago there were theories about the age and function of the arrangement. Today it is assumed that this is a calendar from the 12th century before Christ.

A saga gives a different interpretation of the stone circles: The legend has it that a frolicsome wedding party celebrated here long ago. The party bowled with bread and sausages until a ghost, appearing as an old man, asked the boisterous group to end the game. However, the wedding party did not do what they had been asked. They scorned the old man instead. So he turned the bride, the groom and the guests into stones. A shepherd, who happened to be nearby, was to be spared. But in spite of his promise, he looked back out of curiosity when fleeing and therefore was also transformed into stone together with his sheep and dog.

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Boitin, Germany
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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gottfried Beier (8 months ago)
Am besten im Frühjahr zu besichtigen, wenn das Blattwerk noch nicht da ist.
christian heinrich (11 months ago)
Toller mystischer Ort
Harald Kumpart (11 months ago)
Hier kann man die Waldesruhe wirklich genießen.
Tino Oestreich (14 months ago)
Ein sehr interessanter Ort mitten im Wald. Ein Besuch dorthin ist immer lohnenswert und lässt Raum für sagenhafte Erzählungen.
Lothar Beutin (16 months ago)
Ein Ort an dem Kräfte gebündelt worden. Kaum jemanden läßt die Stimmung dort unberührt. Es ist nicht ein Ort der erhebt, sondern eher an die Erde fesselt. Bei näherem Hinsehen erkennt man die Unterschiede zwischen den einzelnen Granitsteinen, sie sind unbehauen, zeigen dennoch Spuren, die wie Gesichter aussehen.
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