Schloss Bürgeln

Kandern, Germany

First mentioned as a fortified complex in 1125 and used as a chapel, Bürgeln was built by local land-owner Lord Werner von Kaltenbach, who subsequently donated all his possessions to the St. Blasien Benedictine monastery. Under monastic control, Bürgeln became the seat of the St. Blasien Provost, the religious representative and church tax collector for the local area, including the convent at Sitzenkirch and the nearby communities of Obereggenen and Marzell. During the peasant's revolt of 1525 the castle was looted. Then in 1556 Charles II Margrave of Baden-Durlach, in whose territory Bürgeln sat, introduced the Reformation, releasing the local communities from the control of the Catholic monastery and its Bürgeln Provost.

In 1689, during the War of the Spanish Succession, the property was severely damaged, and between 1692 and 1698 was left uninhabited. There were several attempts to restore it, but in 1762 the former structures were demolished down to the foundations, and over the next two years Bürgeln was rebuilt as a 'Schloss' - equivalent to an English stately home - designed to represent Catholic power in the midst of a Protestant stronghold.

At the beginning of the 19th century, with revolutionary France ascendant and the Austrian rulers of the Catholic Holy Roman Empire defeated, imperial possessions were secularised. Initial attempts in 1803 to transfer St. Blasien to the Catholic Order of Malta based in Heitersheim were resisted, but following further Austrian defeats at Ulm and Austerlitz in 1805, large swathes of Austrian Breisgau were transferred over to the Electorate of Baden.

In 1809 Bürgeln was sold into private ownership. By 1926 Bürgeln had come into the possession of Richard Sichler who renovated the property, adding the terrace on the west side. After his death in 1952, his widow stayed on at the house until 1957, when it was sold to the current owners, the Schloss Bürgeln Association, though the sale did not include the contents, which were sold off separately.

Today the house, authentically refurnished, with a restaurant on site and set in small but beautifully laid out gardens.

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Details

Founded: 1762
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

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alamanicus.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marcus K. (12 months ago)
Very interesting ancient castel with a great view into the valley.
Florian Munz (2 years ago)
Very nice old castle with fantastic rose garden in summer and great views over the whole area. I can highly recommend to book a castle tour. Amazing location for weddings!
Carel Schmit (2 years ago)
Impressive building .... could not get in ... was closed....
Joshandvonia Thomas (2 years ago)
We were refused entry because my German was not good enough and our guests did not speak German or French. I've never had such an experience in my life! Our guests were only visiting Europe for 6 days. It was their first trip. We'd saved visiting a palace for their last day. We'd choose this one as it's relatively close to our new home. Trying to be understanding about the language barrier we explained that we were ok with not having a tour and would still pay to just look around a little. We were refused. Thinking maybe our guide was nervous about children in the palace I asked if I could possibly stay outside with children and only the adults could look around. No, we were told. It would be nonsense to visit it without a proper tour! I've visited many places all over the world and have never been told I couldn't visit a tourist location because I didn't speak the national language! Our guests found the experience quite shocking especially since the guide told us no, in detail, numerous times and in different ways, all in English. This was the last tour of the day and he left shortly after we were refused entry. I hope his shorten day was enjoyed. His rudeness certainly marred the last day of our guests visit to Germany.
marius radu (3 years ago)
#cleanair #forest #walk
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