Strome Castle was originally built by the Macdonald Earls of Ross. Later in 1472 the castle was owned by the Clan MacDonald of Lochalsh and Alan MacDonald Dubh, 12th Chief of the Clan Cameron was constable on behalf of the MacDonalds of Lochalsh. In 1539 King James V of Scotland granted the castle to the Clan MacDonnell of Glengarry and Hector Munro, chief of the Clan Munro was constable of the castle for the MacDonalds of Glengarry.

Later in 1602 the castle was besieged by Kenneth Mackenzie, 1st Lord Mackenzie of Kintail, chief of the Clan Mackenzie, assisted by their allies the Clan Matheson. After the MacDonalds surrendered it was demolished and blown up. The MacDonnells of Glengarry built a new castle called Invergarry Castle.

In 1939 the ruined Strome Castle was presented to the National Trust for Scotland. Today the castle comprises a courtyard and the remains of a square tower.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Ruins in United Kingdom

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Head (2 years ago)
Nice little place for 5 min stop
David Ferguson (2 years ago)
Small ruined castle. Not a great deal to do but still worth a wee visit. Good for some scenic photos and I've never seen it busy
Simon Smith (2 years ago)
Stunning location. No facilities and no tourists, hence 5 stars!
Glenn McLaren (2 years ago)
Spectacular views and castle ruins. My kind of thing.
Tim Bull (2 years ago)
Not a massive amount to see but a fun little find none the less. I did really enjoy the view and seeing the place. It's a one room small castle but has a great view of the area.
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