Glenfinnan Viaduct is a railway viaduct on the West Highland Line. Located at the top of Loch Shiel in the West Highlands, the viaduct overlooks the Glenfinnan Monument and the waters of Loch Shiel.

The West Highland Railway was built to Fort William by Lucas and Aird, but there were delays with the West Highland Railway Mallaig Extension (Guarantee) bill for the Mallaig Extension Railway in the House of Commons as the Tory and Liberal parties fought over the issue of subsidies for public transport. This Act did pass in 1896, by which time Lucas & Aird (and their workers) had moved south. New contractors were needed and Robert McAlpine & Sons were taken on with Simpson & Wilson as engineers. Robert McAlpine & Sons was headed by Robert McAlpine, nicknamed 'Concrete Bob' for his innovative use of mass concrete. Concrete was used due to the difficulty of working the hard schist in the area. McAlpine's son Robert, then aged 28, and his nephew William Waddell, took charge of construction, with his younger son Malcolm appointed as assistant.

Construction of the extension from Fort William to Mallaig began in January 1897, and the line opened on 1 April 1901. The Glenfinnan Viaduct, however, was complete enough by October 1898 to be used to transport materials across the valley.

Glenfinnan Viaduct has been used as a location in several films and television series, including Ring of Bright Water, Charlotte Gray, Monarch of the Glen, Stone of Destiny, German Charlie und Louise, and four films of the Harry Potter film series.

References:

    Comments

    Your name



    Details

    Founded: 1897-1901
    Category:

    Rating

    4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Stephen Mudge (5 months ago)
    A great location whether you are on the train or walking through up the valley. I have done both and certainly recommend it. Check the timetable of the steam hauled Jacobite to get the best pictures.
    Artem Sinelnikov (5 months ago)
    Lovers of British history and Harry Potter fans alike rejoice at this magnificent sight. Make sure to bring a tripod for your camera and check the train crossing schedule for some truly memorable pictures and videos.
    Artem Sinelnikov (5 months ago)
    Lovers of British history and Harry Potter fans alike rejoice at this magnificent sight. Make sure to bring a tripod for your camera and check the train crossing schedule for some truly memorable pictures and videos.
    Magda Smich (7 months ago)
    This place is truly magical. It's a 5 minute walk from the car park to the viaduct. There is a footpath all the way to the Glenfinnan train station but it's a longer walk, with some amazing viewpoints on the way, where you can see the whole viaduct and the Glenfinnan monument together with Loch Shiel and the mountains surrounding it. Spectacular, and so worth visiting! We come here every time we are in the Fort William area and it never gets old!
    Abdul Rabbani Shah (8 months ago)
    Lovely rail bridge dating back a century. Would recommend the short walk up to get better views. Look at the website for train crossing times during summer
    Powered by Google

    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

    Historic Site of the week

    Angelokastro

    Angelokastro is a Byzantine castle on the island of Corfu. It is located at the top of the highest peak of the island"s shoreline in the northwest coast near Palaiokastritsa and built on particularly precipitous and rocky terrain. It stands 305 m on a steep cliff above the sea and surveys the City of Corfu and the mountains of mainland Greece to the southeast and a wide area of Corfu toward the northeast and northwest.

    Angelokastro is one of the most important fortified complexes of Corfu. It was an acropolis which surveyed the region all the way to the southern Adriatic and presented a formidable strategic vantage point to the occupant of the castle.

    Angelokastro formed a defensive triangle with the castles of Gardiki and Kassiopi, which covered Corfu"s defences to the south, northwest and northeast.

    The castle never fell, despite frequent sieges and attempts at conquering it through the centuries, and played a decisive role in defending the island against pirate incursions and during three sieges of Corfu by the Ottomans, significantly contributing to their defeat.

    During invasions it helped shelter the local peasant population. The villagers also fought against the invaders playing an active role in the defence of the castle.

    The exact period of the building of the castle is not known, but it has often been attributed to the reigns of Michael I Komnenos and his son Michael II Komnenos. The first documentary evidence for the fortress dates to 1272, when Giordano di San Felice took possession of it for Charles of Anjou, who had seized Corfu from Manfred, King of Sicily in 1267.

    From 1387 to the end of the 16th century, Angelokastro was the official capital of Corfu and the seat of the Provveditore Generale del Levante, governor of the Ionian islands and commander of the Venetian fleet, which was stationed in Corfu.

    The governor of the castle (the castellan) was normally appointed by the City council of Corfu and was chosen amongst the noblemen of the island.

    Angelokastro is considered one of the most imposing architectural remains in the Ionian Islands.