Skipness Castle was built in the early 13th century by the Clan MacSween with later fortifications and other additions made to the castle through the 13th, 14th and 16th centuries. The castle was garrisoned with royal troops in 1494 during King James IV of Scotland's suppression of the Isles. Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll granted Skipness to his younger son Archibald Campbell in 1511.

During the Wars of the Three Kingdoms in 1646, the castle was besieged by forces under the command of Alasdair Mac Colla. During the siege, Alasdair's brother, Gilleasbuig Mac Colla, was killed in August 1646. The castle was abandoned in the 17th century. The Green Lady of Skipness Castle is said to haunt the location.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

meltem kogelbauer (14 months ago)
Castle itself isn't so exciting but the area is good for walking. The seafood cabin nearby is the only place for food in the area serving delicious seafood.
Michael (14 months ago)
Unfortunately access inside and on top of the castle is currently closed, possibly due to covid situation. You can however roam the grounds freely and still get up and close to the castle. Still worth the visit despite the limitations, the views out to sea are amazing.
Ewelina Greenwood (14 months ago)
Great views. Castle remaining is really impresive and you can see isle of Arran across. Its about 5-10 minutes walk from the car park. There is highly rated fish smokery/restaurant on the right of the castle
Cheryl Clarke (15 months ago)
Parked at the Claonaig ferry car park at the start of the road and cycled out to the castle. Great views of Arran on the cycle and you pass a lovely sandy beach. Skipness Castle was lovely to see. You are able to go inside, there are some information boards up and the views from the top landing are fantastic. You can also make your way over to the ruin and cemetery that you can see if you want to explore further.
Steven McDiarmid (19 months ago)
I was surprised at the size of its curtain wall it sits on a lovely beech couldn’t get in to the tower as it was closed it is a 7 mile drive from the main road
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