The Giants' Graves are the remains of two Neolithic chambered tombs on the Isle of Arran. They are situated within 40 metres of each other, and stand on a ridge 120 metres above the sea in a clearing in a forest, overlooking Whiting Bay to the south.

The northern cairn has been much robbed, but the edges are still well-defined. The chamber is 6 metres long, and around 1 metre wide. It was excavated in 1902, and among the artifacts recovered were pottery shards, flint knives, and leaf-shaped arrowheads.

The southern cairn is at right angles to the larger northern cairn. The chamber is about 4 metres long, and over 1 metre wide. Excavations in 1902 only revealed soil and stones, however in 1961-1962 further exploration produced nine sherds of a round-based vessel, and fragments of burnt bone.

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Founded: 4000-2500 BCE
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in United Kingdom

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Doug Graham (5 years ago)
A fine alternative route to Glenashdale Falls. Up the zigzag path 400m from the main road on the south side of the burn. Great views to the north.
Mark Hay (6 years ago)
Fantastic piece of history set among stunning views. Thoroughly recommend ticking this off in a loop with the falls. Some steep ascents and decents. Definitely not suitable for buggies or infirm although you can manage it carrying babies and toddlers much of the way! Whole loop likely to.take between 1.5 and 2 hours.
Frank Macpherson (6 years ago)
Went circuit to Glenashdale falls then Giants Graves ... A lovely walk and great views over Holy Isle
Laurie (6 years ago)
Lovely walk and nice place
Richard Manning (6 years ago)
Brilliant circular walk when combined with the Glenashedale falls, great views across to Holy Island and of the sea across toward Ayr
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