Kildonan Castle stands on the southern coast of the Isle of Arran. The castle's name is derived from the name of a former resident, Saint Donan, who is said to be buried on the island. It was built in the 13th century by the MacDonalds, the Lords of the Isles. The castle stands on the cliffs, overlooking the island of Pladda and the entrance to the Firth of Clyde. It was built to defend against enemies attacking through the Firth. The castle was used as a hunting lodge by the Kings of Scotland, including Robert III, when the island belonged to the crown. The castle became the property of the Earls of Arran in 1544.

Kildonan castle stands out on the old raised beach behind and above the village. It was once, with Lochranza Castle and Brodick Castle, one of three fortresses guarding Arran's strategically important position in the approaches to the Clyde. Today's Kildonan Castle is only a shadow of its former self, but still reflects its origins as a 13th Century keep.

The castle was originally built by the Lords of the Isles, but by 1406 was in the ownership of Robert III, who in that year passed it on to his illegitimate son, John Stewart of Ardgowan. In 1544 it was acquired by the Hamilton family, the Earls of Arran.

Kildonan Castle has long been ivy clad and unstable, making close examination a dangerous proposition. It also stands in the garden of a house, meaning that it can only be seen from a nearby right of way leading to the beach. Not far from the castle is an increasingly ruinous lookout tower, a relic from Kildonan's days as the location of Arran's only Coastguard station, which moved to Lamlash in 1981.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Elizabeth Corcoran (17 months ago)
You CANNOT get anywhere near this folks. I'll save you the bother...this is all you can glimpse... The other reviewers closer photos are taken before they were arrested for trespassing I guess
Julia Izatt (17 months ago)
Privately owned so not able to get very near to view.
James Hamilton (18 months ago)
Just love here. Would love to return and stay here forever.
Jason Drysdale (2 years ago)
Lovely beach at the foot of the remains but it appears your can't get near the castle, of which there is very little left.
Phil Sales (2 years ago)
If you have never been to Arran you must put it on your bucket list,but be prepared to get wet there is always water even when it's dry
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