St. Bartholomew's Church

Liège, Belgium

The Collegiate Church of St. Bartholomew was built in coal sandstone, starting in the late 11th century (the chancel) and lasting until the late 12th century (the massive westwork, with its twin towers which were reconstructed in 1876). It underwent, like most ancient religious buildings, modifications through the centuries. Nevertheless, the Meuse Romanesque—Ottonian architecture character of its architecture remained deeply rooted. The 18th century saw the addition of two more aisles, the opening of a neoclassical portal in the walls of the westwork, and the French Baroque redecoration of the interior. The interior of the western section has recently been restored back to the original style.

The church contains numerous works of art, among which may be mentioned The Glorification of the Holy Cross, a tableau of the local painter Bertholet Flemalle (1614-1675); The Crucifixion, from another local artist, Englebert Fisen (1655-1733); and a statue of St. Roch by Renier Panhay de Rendeux.

St. Bartholomew is the site of one of the most known examples of ecclesiastical Mosan art, a baptismal font attributed to the goldsmith Renier de Huy. It was commissioned at the beginning of the 12th century (1107-1108) by the Abbot Hellin for the Church of Notre-Dame-aux-Fonts, now destroyed, where local baptisms traditionally were administered.

The font was installed in St. Bartholomew Church in 1804, after having been spared from the occupying forces of the French Revolutionary Army.

This work heralds a resurgence of Greek influences on Western art. The brass tank, resting on ten (originally twelve) ox figures, presents five scenes: the Baptism of Jesus in the Jordan, the preaching of St. John the Baptist, the baptism of the catechumens, the baptism of the Centurion Cornelius, and the baptism of the philosopher Craton.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alain Coutelier (2 years ago)
Magnifique Collégiale en plein cœur historique de la ville de Liège. Splendide bâtiment à l'architecture extérieure rénovée. L'intérieur de cette Collégiale mérite votre visite touristique en dehors des heures des offices (religion chrétienne) ou même pendant si vous souhaitez assister à une messe et admirer la magnificence de l'endroit et son évolution historique dans le temps (tableaux didactiques à disposition, vente de publications,...) Les fonds baptismaux constituent une attraction historique de cette Collégiale située Place Saint-Barthélemy.
Ivan Pletin (2 years ago)
Closed on Monday
Pieter van der Valk (2 years ago)
You feel welcome when you enter this church. A small entrance fee is needed. But you get a hand-out in your language. I didn't read it because there is a lot to see. But make sure to watch the nice short video. The staff started it in Dutch, just for me! The baptismal font is very impressive. It is created with the lost wax method casting method. It is a very old method but it needs an enormous craftsmanship. The size , the sculpture and the openness proves that the make was a master in this craft. It is supposed to be from about 1107, but I personally think it could be much older. because it's very classical appearance.
Akili 225 (2 years ago)
Cool
De Voeght Aurélie (2 years ago)
Go and enter in one of the oldest church of Liège!! Let the "bénévoles" show you the way into our history!
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