St. John's Church (Sint-Janskerk), named after St.John the Baptist, was originally built as a baptistery for the St. Servatius Chapter of Maastricht. In 1633, after a period in which it functioned as an autonomous parish church, it came into the possession of the Dutch Reformed Church, established in 1632. This as a result of the capture of Maastricht from the Spanish army in 1632 by the troops of the Seven United Provinces of the Netherlands under the command of Prince Frederik Hendrik of Orange. After the establishment of a state-church, i.e. the Dutch Reformed Church, all catholic churches had become protestant in the regions already conquered.

The Prince Bishop of Liège, the Duke of Brabant and Prince Frederik Hendrik agreed that in Maastricht in principle only smaller chapels should be handed over to the protestants. The bigger churches remained catholic, which was exceptional from a national point of view. However, already in 1633 the protestant chapels proved to be too small and after new discussions two churches, one of which was St.John's, came into the possession of the protestants. The first service of the Dutch Reformed Church took place on the 1st of January, 1634.

Since 1987 the church has been in the use of the 'Protestantse Gemeente St. Jan', a federation of two different reformed communities.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

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www.sintjanmaastricht.nl

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alfred Aquino (7 months ago)
Beautiful gothic church in the heart of Maastricht. Very detailed, well maintained and truly a marvellous piece of work. Must visit if you’re in the city.
Ishanka Hasaranga (12 months ago)
The beautiful church at the center of Maastricht. It's very unique for its red colour.
Barbara Dzino (2 years ago)
Very good viewpoint of the city. Worth the steps
Barbara (2 years ago)
Very good viewpoint of the city. Worth the steps
çağdaş beşoğul (2 years ago)
A church with a red colored belfry, located in the heart of the city, so one way or another you would highly likely see it and also see the extraordinary sculptures in the vicinity of this church
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