Cryptoporticus

Reims, France

The Cryptoporticus of Reims is is a very well preserved third century AD Roman passageway. At the time, Reims was a Gallo-Roman town known as Durocortorum.

Like other structures of this kind, the Cryptoporticus of Reims was a semi-subterranean arched passageway, the roof of which would have been a walkway. It would have been one of three such passageways surrounding the forum of Durocortorum.

The Cryptoporticus of Reims is an excellent example of this type of Roman architecture, particularly as it is so very well preserved.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Place du Forum 6, Reims, France
See all sites in Reims

Details

Founded: 200-300 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nick Porter (12 months ago)
A great city to stay lots of things to do champagne tasting and lots of bars and restaurants
Kevin Sadaj (2 years ago)
Fun place to see a concert in the summer! Many little places to eat and drink.
Payel Khan (2 years ago)
Nice place...
Thierry Salus (3 years ago)
An animated, lively square in the heart of Rheims. Some Roman ruins at the end of it, and medieval houses on the side. A good range of bars and restaurants
Cheri V (3 years ago)
What you see are Roman ruins called "Crypto Porticus" or Hidden Doorways/Passages. These were underground then. It is one of the five cryptoportici known to exist in the world and date to 3rd century BC!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Ängsö Castle

Ängsö Castle was first named as "Engsev" in a royal charter by king Canute I of Sweden (r. 1167-1196), in which he stated that he had inherited the property after his father Eric IX of Sweden. Until 1272, it was owned by the Riseberga Abbey, and then taken over by Gregers Birgersson.

From 1475 until 1710, it was owned by the Sparre family. The current castle was built as a fortress by riksråd Bengt Fadersson Sparre in the 1480s. In 1522, Ängsö Castle was taken after a siege by king Gustav Vasa, since its owner, Fadersson's son Knut Bengtsson, sided with Christian II of Denmark. However, in 1538 it was given by the king to Bengtsson's daughter Hillevi Knutsdotter, who was married to Arvid Trolle.

In 1710, the castle was taken over by Carl Piper and Christina Piper. Ängsö Castle was owned by the Piper family from 1710 until 1971, and is now owned by the Westmanna foundation. The castle building itself was made into a museum in 1959 and was made a listed building in 1965. It is currently opened to visitors during the summers.

The castle is a cubical building in four stores made by stone and bricks. The lower parts is preserved from the middle ages. It was redecorated and expanded in the 1630s. The 4th storey as well as the roof is from the expansion of Carl Hårleman from 1740-41. It gained its current appearance in the 1740s.