Porte Mars is an ancient Roman triumphal arch in Reims. It dates from the third century AD, and was the widest arch in the Roman world.

The arch stands 32 metres long and 13 metres high. It was named after a nearby temple to Mars. The arch has many highly detailed carvings on its exterior and on the ceilings of its three passageways. Local folklore says that the inhabitants of Rheims built the arch in gratitude when the Romans brought major roads through their city. It served as a part of castle of archeveque and a city gate until 1544 was closed of it. In 1817, the buildings around it were removed, bringing the arch into full view.

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Details

Founded: 200-300 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Louis Kruger (2 years ago)
Looks good in the photos. It was closed up completely with a white sail (probably for restoration) yesterday. Much larger than I expected from the photos.
Simon Heathfield (2 years ago)
A bit disappointing at the moment.
Attila Tényi (2 years ago)
Beautiful arch. Built in roman age.
Charlotte Ellis (2 years ago)
Unfortunately, La Porte de Mars was under reconstruction and covered in scaffolding when we visited. The size was still very inpressive!
Cheri V (3 years ago)
4/14/2017 Even though the gate is completely covered for restoration, I still gave 5 stars because... UNESCO Roman Ruins!!! I will return to see Romulus, Remus, Castor and Pollux one day. At 32 meters long, the longest Roman arch made and existing.
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