Abbey of Saint-Germain d'Auxerre

Auxerre, France

The Abbey of Saint-Germain d"Auxerre was a Benedictine monastery dedicated to its founder Saint Germain of Auxerre, the bishop of Auxerre, who died in 448. The abbey reached the apex of its cultural importance during the Carolingian era; the source for its early history is an account of the Miracula Sancti Germani Episcopi Autissiodorensis ('Miracles of Saint Germain, Bishop of Auxerre') written before ca. 880. The earliest surviving architectural remains are also of the ninth century.

In 1927, beneath the 17th-century frescoed plaster walls of the crypt, were discovered ninth-century wall frescoes, the only surviving large-scale paintings of their date in France to compare to the illuminated manuscripts.

During the Revolution, several bays of the nave were demolished and the secularized abbey was used as a hospital. The former nave extended beneath the present forecourt.

In the late twentieth century the abbey"s residential and service buildings were remodeled as a museum, presenting prehistoric, Gallo-Roman and medieval finds from Auxerre. An exhibition in 1990 brought the abbey"s cultural impact into focus. The former abbey church remains in use for worship at stated times.

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Details

Founded: 9th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Art Buy (2 years ago)
Lots of interesting old relics
Art Buy (2 years ago)
Lots of interesting old relics
Frédéric Naisse (2 years ago)
Very nice museum
Frédéric Naisse (2 years ago)
Very nice museum
Jim Hilyard (3 years ago)
the cathedral is much more impressive if you only have time for one
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