Stramberk Castle

Štramberk, Czech Republic

Štramberk Castle ruins have an unknown origin (according to an old tale, the site of its original planned location was on the opposite hill Kotouè, but that was prevented by dwarves from the cave Devil's hole). Apparently, it was made to protect country boundaries. According to the most recent information, the castle was built either by members of the aristocratic family, Benešovic, or more precisely, after 1200, by the princes of the Pøemyslide family. In the 13th century, the castle was owned by the knights of the Templar order (see T. J. Pešina, Prodromus Moraviographiae, 1663). After the abolition of the order in 1312, the castle came under the administration of the Czech king Jan Lucemburský and, between 1333 and 1346, it was owned by the Moravian margrave Karel, later King of Bohemia (Charles IV). From 1350 (since 1359 called castrum Strallenberg), it was 25 later owned by the Moravian margrave Jan Jindøich, the founder of the town; then in 1375 it was taken over by his son, the margrave Jošt Lucemburský. After 1380, the most important owners of the castle were members of the Moravian-Silesian branch of the family Benešovic, the lords of Kravaøe (until 1433). After 1533, the castle started to deteriorate. Its oldest illustration (from 1722) shows a two-palace structure with farm buildings and two prismatic ramparts. In 1783, the outer part of the castle collapsed and the masonry was used for building purposes. The original height of the N-E fortification in the inner part of the castle remained unchanged. Between 1901 and 1903, its cylindrical tower called „bergrit“ (height 40 m, 10 m in diameter) was covered with a roof and changed into a lookout designed by the famous Prague architect Kamil Hilbert. The outer ramparts were partly repaired and completed with two gates. A plaque designed by the sculptor František Juráò, was fitted into the fortification in memory of Adolf Hrstka M.D. (1864-1931), physician and former mayor of Štramberk and its indefatigable promoter. The gothic tower of the castle together with adjoining parts of the fortification (NKP = National cultural monument) generally known as Trúba (local expression for round timber) dominates the town. In 1994, it became its property.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lukas GERLA (3 years ago)
Always good.
Denisa Lacinová (4 years ago)
Very beautiful place...
Svetlana Volkova (4 years ago)
Beautiful fairy tale town and incredible view from the tower
Desislava Glaveeva (4 years ago)
Its historical, nice view, nice architecture around. Together with "strambersky usi" all is great and you can feel the spirit of the town. However going up to the tower is difficult for families with strollers, and I'm not sure if a person with disabilities could go up. Hope they can do something about it.
Blazej Hudzikowski (5 years ago)
The tower offers a breathtaking view of Štramberk. It's not so easy to climb all of its stairs, but definitely worth visiting.
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