Bytča Castle was originally built as a water castle by Pongrác Szentmiklósi in the 13th century and rebuilt between 1571 and 1574 in Renaissance style by Ferenc Thurzó. The Italian architect Ján Kilian of Milan was invited to oversee the construction. George Thurzo continued his father’s activities and due to him the Wedding Palace was built in 1601, which was meant to serve for the weddings of his six daughters. From more decorative details it can be concluded that the palace is the work of Italian masters who lived in Bytča. The building is embellished by rich sgraffito figural and floral ornaments around the stone windows and portal. Inside the one-story, rectangular building is a particularly interesting foyer on the ground floor and a large Wedding hall on the first floor, which was for a longtime the largest of its kind in Slovakia.

There were two pharmacies, a school, a typing office, a library and an assembly room in the castle. In the eastern part of the castle there was the so-called big hall, intended for assemblies during the reign of George Thurzo. In the northern part there was a castle treasury, which was later turned into a chapel by the Esterházy family. After the Thurzo family had died out at the beginning of the 17th century, the castle was acquired by the Esterházy family, who converted it into a farm building. In 1862, the property was bought by the Popper family of merchants, who transformed the castle into flats and the Wedding Palace into a district court. Ján Ujváry, also called Ficko, Elizabeth Báthory’s helper was also imprisoned in Bytča castle. At the beginning of the 18th century, the legendary Slovak outlaw Juraj Jánošík served as a prison officer in the castle. He helped the imprisoned Tomáš Uhorčík escape and they created a forest robber group. This is why this national heroes’s legend might have started in Bytča. Today the castle houses the State District Archive, the Wedding Palace belongs to Považské Museum in Žilina. Today the Wedding Palace is after the reconstruction and is open.

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Zámocká 2, Bytča, Slovakia
See all sites in Bytča

Details

Founded: 1571-1574
Category: Castles and fortifications in Slovakia

More Information

www.tikzilina.eu

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monika Kuźniewska (16 months ago)
Very nice, but its closed sundays
Yoga Yogin (22 months ago)
Very nice.
justas berzelionis (22 months ago)
Only dragon is interesting
Zdeněk Briol (2 years ago)
Super
Jana Chobotová (2 years ago)
Tak nádherný zámok, aká škoda, že zvonku chátra. Vo vnútri sa nachádza detašované pracovisko Štátneho archívu ZA. Ak sa chcete dozvedieť viac o ére Thurzovcov, rozhodne navštívte pani riaditeľku archívu, je to milá pani :-)
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