Windberg Abbey was founded by Count Albert I of Bogen with the assistance of Bishop Otto of Bamberg on the site of the original seat of the Counts of Bogen. Initially it was not a specifically Premonstratensian foundation, but was transferred to the order as an already established community between 1121 and 1146. The quire of the church was dedicated in 1142 by Heinrich Zdik, Bishop of Olmütz, in the presence of Count Albert. Duke Vladislav II of Bohemia secured the endowment of the monastery by granting it the properties of Schüttenhofen (now Sušice) and Albrechtsried.

The foundation was dedicated in honour of the Virgin Mary and in 1146 raised to the status of an abbey. After the extension of the abbey church it was dedicated on 28 November 1167 by the Premonstratensian abbot of Leitomischl (now Litomyšl) and Johannes IV, bishop of Olmütz.

The abbey was secularised and dissolved during the secularisation of Bavaria in 1803. The church became a parish church and the abbot's house the residence of the parish clergy. The monastic buildings passed into private ownership, and from 1835 were used for a brewery.

In 1923 the monastic community was re-established here by Premonstratensians from Berne-Heeswijk Abbey in the Netherlands. As of 2005, 33 Premonstratensian canons live in Windberg.

The church is a three-aisled basilica with transept. It mostly originates from the 12th century and shows the influence of Hirsau Abbey. The monumental chief portal is especially impressive; the north portal is somewhat simpler. The tower, built in the 13th century, received its present form as recently as 1750 - 1760.

The Baroque high altar was made between 1735 and 1740, and contains a statue of the Virgin from about 1650. The pulpit dates from 1674. The stucco work in the church interior was created by Mathias Obermayr, who also made the four extremely detailed side-altars, two of which are dated 1756.

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Details

Founded: 1121-1146
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christian Hummel (16 months ago)
Worth a visit!
Joshua Van Rijssel (2 years ago)
Nice monastery
Joshua van Rijssel (2 years ago)
Nice monastery
Zoe Karumenos (3 years ago)
For this very beautiful church is worth a longer journey. It has just been renovated and is a feast for the eye. The original church building never burned down and was never demolished. A walk through this monastery church is therefore a fascinating journey through 850 years of church history. A guide is recommended. Visitors should allow enough time for the visit. There are many unusual details to discover. Such as the numerous stars used to paint the interior walls of the church. It should be more than 365. The abbot who commissioned her was an astronomer and astrologer and also hid some zodiac signs in the church. Just play detective yourself. And who wants to do something for his salvation, can try the new, very modern designed confessional. To make an appointment with one of the Fathers. Due to the proximity to the youth education center, the fathers are updated and have an open ear for what is haunting people today. There are also younger patrons on site.
Zoe Karumenos (3 years ago)
For this very beautiful church is worth a longer journey. It has just been renovated and is a feast for the eye. The original church building never burned down and was never demolished. A walk through this monastery church is therefore a fascinating journey through 850 years of church history. A guide is recommended. Visitors should allow enough time for the visit. There are many unusual details to discover. Such as the numerous stars used to paint the interior walls of the church. It should be more than 365. The abbot who commissioned her was an astronomer and astrologer and also hid some zodiac signs in the church. Just play detective yourself. And who wants to do something for his salvation, can try the new, very modern designed confessional. To make an appointment with one of the Fathers. Due to the proximity to the youth education center, the fathers are updated and have an open ear for what is haunting people today. There are also younger patrons on site.
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