Nassenfels Castle

Nassenfels, Germany

Nassenfels castle dates from the 12th-13th century. The first reference to the castle is dated to 1245, when Count Gebhard III of Hirschberg was assassinated when he was besieging Nassenfels castle. The castle was reconstructed and enlarged later and the current appearance dates from c. 1400. The three towers were built by bishop Friedrich von Oettingen. Nassenfels was again restored in 1464 and 1699. in 1807 the castle was sold to private owners and used as a quarry.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stefan Bockelmann (2 years ago)
Just an impressive, powerful place.
Julia Bock (2 years ago)
It is the ideal location for events such as the annual culture days or the pre-Christmas market. In a historic castle courtyard without annoying traffic, what could be nicer?
Luis Seichter (4 years ago)
It's ok very sad that you can't do yours in it
derek dardis (5 years ago)
Very quaint
Sandra W. (5 years ago)
Schöne alte Burg, nicht weit von Neuburg an der Donau. Ich kam zufällig nach dem Besuch des Schlosses Neuburg hier vorbei und habe mich über das alte Gemäuer gefreut. Schönes Motiv
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