Eichstätt Cathedral

Eichstätt, Germany

Together with the cloister and the mortuary, the two-aisled Eichstätt cathedral is regarded as one of the most important medieval monuments in Bavaria. The first Roman Catholic cathedral of Our Lady and Sts. Willibald and Salvator was built in the 8th century. It was destroyed during the Hungarian invasions but the church preserved. Parts of this church have been preserved in the masonry.

The current cathedral has parts built between the 11th century and the 16th century. Bishop Heribert (1022-1042) started the construction in Carolingian-Ottonian style and bishop Gundekar II inaugurated the cathedral in 1060.

The Gothic west choir dates from 1250-1270. The east choir was reconstructed in the late 14th century. The Roritzerkapelle (1463-1480) and cloister (1410) where added later.

The west façade was restored in Baroque style in 1716-1718 and the pulpit was made in 1720. The rococo altar dates from 1745.

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Details

Founded: 1022
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hans Eisenrieder (16 months ago)
an der Tür schon die Meisterleitung, Türschloss die heut nicht mehr zu sehen sind, oder nur in diese aus der damaligen Zeit. Befindet sich man im Dom fällt sofort die Orgel, einen Klang, der unbeschreiblich ist, auf. Wenn man hier die Zeit geniest, dann vergeht hier und dort die Zeit in Kunst und Kultur und wie es damals gewesen ein könnte. Wenn man hier unter dem Chorgewölbe steht, sollte man eigentlich auch die Kraft haben, einen schreienden singenden Ton, mal "Danke zu singen für Frieden". kommt zu seinem Erlebnis.
Werner H. Fahnenstich (16 months ago)
Wer hat Euch erzählt, ich sei dort drinnen gewesen? Gelogen!
Wölfchen vom Walde (16 months ago)
Ein imposanter Bau und im Inneren sehr schön. Ein Besuch lohnt sich, weil Eichstätt auch eine sehr schöne Altstadt hat.
Petra Wolf (2 years ago)
Der Dom zu Eichstätt ist sehr imposant und das Weihnachtskonzert mit dem Orgelspiel war sehr schön. Der kleine Weihnachtsmarkt um dem Dom herum war toll. Es war ein sehr schöner Abend.
Artur Zuk (2 years ago)
Warto tam wejść, zatrzymać się i pomodlić. Św. Willibaldzie módl się za nami!
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