Prague Castle, dating from the 9th century, is the official residence of the President of the Czech Republic. The castle was a seat of power for kings of Bohemia, Holy Roman emperors, and presidents of Czechoslovakia. The Bohemian Crown Jewels are kept within a hidden room inside it. According to the Guinness Book of Records, Prague Castle is the largest ancient castle in the world, occupying an area of almost 70,000 m2. It is also one of the most popular tourist attractions in Czech Republic.

Ancient history

The history of the castle stretches back to the year 870 with the construction of its first walled building, the Church of the Virgin Mary. The Basilica of Saint George and the Basilica of St. Vitus were founded under the reign of Vratislav and his son St. Wenceslas in the first half of the 10th century.

The first convent in Bohemia was founded in the castle, next to the church of St. George. A Romanesque palace was erected here during the 12th century. In the 14th century, under the reign of Charles IV the royal palace was rebuilt in Gothic style and the castle fortifications were strengthened. In place of rotunda and basilica of St. Vitus began building of a vast Gothic church, that have been completed almost six centuries later.

During the Hussite Wars and the following decades, the castle was not inhabited. In 1485, King Ladislaus II Jagello began to rebuild the castle. The massive Vladislav Hall (built by Benedikt Rejt) was added to the Royal Palace. New defence towers were also built on the north side of the castle.

A large fire in 1541 destroyed large parts of the castle. Under the Habsburgs, some new buildings in Renaissance style were added. Ferdinand I built the Belvedere as a summer palace for his wife Anne. Rudolph II used Prague Castle as his main residence. He founded the northern wing of the palace, with the Spanish Hall, where his precious art collections were exhibited.

The Second Prague defenestration in 1618 began the Bohemian Revolt. During the subsequent wars, the Castle was damaged and dilapidated. Many works from the collection of Rudolph II were looted by Swedes in 1648, in the Battle of Prague (1648) which was the final act of the Thirty Years' War.

Modern history

The last major rebuilding of the castle was carried out by Empress Maria Theresa in the second half of the 18th century. Following his abdication in 1848, and the succession of his nephew, Franz Joseph, to the throne, the former emperor, Ferdinand I, made Prague Castle his home.

In 1918, the castle became the seat of the president of the new Czechoslovak Republic T.G. Masaryk. The New Royal Palace and the gardens were renovated by Slovenian architect Jože Plečnik. In this period the St Vitus Cathedral was finished. Renovations continued in 1936 under Plečnik's successor Pavel Janák.

On March 15, 1939, shortly after the Nazi regime strong-armed former Czech President Emil Hacha (who suffered a heart attack during the negotiations) to hand his nation over to the Germans, Adolf Hitler spent a night in the Prague Castle. During the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia in World War II, Prague Castle became the headquarters of Reinhard Heydrich, the 'Reich Protector of Bohemia and Moravia'. He was said to have placed the Bohemian crown on his head; old legends say an usurper who places the crown on his head is doomed to die within a year. Less than a year after assuming power, on May 27, 1942, Heydrich was attacked by British-trained Slovak and Czech soldiers while on his way to the Castle, and died of his wounds a week later.

Post-World War II

After the liberation of Czechoslovakia, the Castle housed the offices of the communist Czechoslovak government. During the Velvet Revolution, Alexander Dubček, the leader of Czechoslovakia during the Prague Spring, appeared on a balcony overlooking Wenceslas Square to hear throngs of protesters below shouting 'Dubček to the Castle!' As they pushed for him to take his seat as president of the country at Prague Castle, he embraced the crowd as a symbol of democratic freedom.

After Czechoslovakia split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, the castle became the seat of the Head of State of the new Czech Republic. Similar to what Masaryk did with Plečnik, president Václav Havel commissioned Bořek Šípek to be the architect of post-communism Prague Castle's necessary improvements, in particular of the facelift of the castle's gallery of paintings.

Architectural styles of Prague Castle

The castle buildings represent virtually every architectural style of the last millennium. Prague Castle includes Gothic St Vitus Cathedral, Romanesque Basilica of St. George, a monastery and several palaces, gardens and defense towers. Most of the castle areas are open to tourists. Nowadays, the castle houses several museums, including the National Gallery collection of Bohemian baroque and mannerism art, exhibition dedicated to Czech history, Toy Museum and the picture gallery of Prague Castle, based on the collection of Rudolph II. The Summer Shakespeare Festival regularly takes place in the courtyard of Burgrave Palace.

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Founded: 870 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

D Tailor (39 days ago)
Absolutely amazing venue. Superior views across Prague. I was very impressed with the food service. I was lucky enough to be invited to a special dinner. I was particularly impressed that the staff were so attentive that before my drink had finished I was presented with a drink and they remembered what I was drinking. Absolutely phenomenal. The main lady running the service was a pleasure speaking with and clearly understood how to make guests feel special. Very impressive, it's rare that I am blown away. The venue is fantastic, the balcony for drinks reception is amazing. The food was truly amazing, and the service was spectacular.
Jinesh V George (10 months ago)
Prague Castle is a castle complex in Prague, Czech Republic, built in the 9th century. It is the official office of the President of the Czech Republic. The castle was a seat of power for kings of Bohemia, Holy Roman emperors, and presidents of Czechoslovakia. Today Prague Castle, besides being the seat of the head of state, is also an important cultural and historical monument. The Crown Jewels are kept at Prague Castle, as are the relics of Bohemian kings, precious Christian relics, art treasures and historical documents. You can enter the castle through the main entrance. Walking around the empty grounds will make the experience even more magical. If you can, plan your visit to the castle for during the week, as the weekend always sees the biggest crowds. There are 3 entrances to Prague Castle, all of which have security checks. Prague Castle has been an important symbol of the Czech state for more than a thousand years. The Guinness Book of Records claims that Prague Castle is the largest ancient castle in the world and its magnitude is certainly astonishing. The castle is also the city's most recognizable landmark, because it dominates the skyline: the castle is perched majestically on the hillside in the Castle
Ciaran Oosterhof (10 months ago)
Great and enjoyable activity to do while in Prague. Of course there are a lot of tourists but that is with reason. Some of the exhibitions are free, but paying for the extras is advised. With the combined ticket you could roam for multiple hours and see the great cathedral of Prague, the old hall of kings, the ancient tombs and a great collection of armor and weaponry at the Golden lane. Despite the large crowds in some places it is really worth your while. Also really easy to reach by foot from the old city centre.
Smith P (15 months ago)
Prague is castle is huge. At the entrance you will find the security who are well dressed and still. The are the attraction for many. People click pictures with them too. The inside of castle is very beautiful. The garden has panoramic views. It's a must visit place.
Sabrina (2 years ago)
Most definitely one of my favourite place I visited whilst in Prague and worth a visit. We went all the way to the top and the views were stunning. It is also really nice to just walk around. However, I do think they need more seating and restaurant areas at the top as it’s a long walk up a lot of steps and there is hardly anywhere to rest especially if you have children.
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