Orthodox Church of St. Peter and Paul

Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic

The beautifully decorated, Byzantine style Orthodox Church of Saint Peter and Paul was erected between the years 1893 and 1898 according to the design of architect Gustav Widemann from Františkovy Lázně (Franzensbad). It was built in the fashion of the Byzantine-old Russian church in Ostankino near Moscow. The funds necessary for the construction of the church were raised among wealthy Serbian and Russian clientele and nobility. The new church replaced the no longer satisfactory Orthodox chapel in Mariánskolázeňská Street.

The richly decorated Byzantine style church has a floor plan in the shape of a Greek cross and five gold-plated cupolas. The church walls are complemented with plentiful ornamental and figural murals. The church interior is dominated by a wooden majolica iconostasis with oil icons of saints by painter Tyurin. The iconostasis was originally made in Kuznetsovo for the World Exhibition in Paris in 1900. A bronze relief of Peter I by sculptor M. Hiller is installed by the staircase opposite Sadová Street. The church is accessible to the public during regular opening hours.

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Founded: 1893-1898
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zdenek Coufal (12 months ago)
Beautiful and extraordinary (in Czech republic) building. Really worth seeing.
Neha Mandlecha (13 months ago)
Worth the visit. Nice walk in the vicinity. Beautiful and peaceful area.
Angel pap (15 months ago)
Magnificent Russian Orthodox Church which is very well preserved. The little shop inside the church, ruins the whole beautiful image.
Nicky LiakataGrafix (15 months ago)
One of the most beautiful sites in Karlovy Vary! A recently renovated Church, very different from the ones you usually see in this country. Definitely a must see! A bus stop is near the church but if you have enough time, walk up the small hill and back down. The scenery is wonderful!
GreenSpeed_PRO (15 months ago)
Very beautiful temple with very strong positive energy. Sadly there's not allowed use of phone inside, so photos are not in best quality. Only way to find out how powerful this place is, is going there yourself ! 5/5☆ Definitively powerful experience !
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