The Great Synagogue in Plzeň is the second largest synagogue in Europe. A Viennese architect called Fleischer drew up the original plans for the synagogue in Gothic style with granite buttresses and twin 65-meter towers. The cornerstone was laid on December 2, 1888. City councillors rejected the plan in a clear case of tower envy as they felt that the grand erection would compete with the nearby Cathedral of St. Bartholomew. Emmanuel Klotz put forward a new design in 1890 retaining the original ground plan and hence the cornerstone, but lowering the towers by 20m and creating the distinctive look combining Romantic and neo-Renaissance styles covered with Oriental decorations and a giant Star of David. The design was quickly approved and master builder Rudolf Štech completed work in 1893 for the bargain price of 162,138 guilders.

At the time the Jewish community in Plzeň numbered some 2,000. The mixture of styles is truly bewildering; from the onion domes of a Russian orthodox church, to the Arabic style ceiling, to the distinctly Indian looking Aron kodesh. The synagogue was used without interruption until the Nazi occupation of World War II, and the Jewish community that retook possession of the synagogue at the end of hostilities had been decimated by the Holocaust. The synagogue was used as a storage facility during the war and was thereby spared from destruction. The last regular service was held in 1973, and then the synagogue was closed down and allowed to fall into disrepair under communist rule. Restoration was undertaken from 1995-1998, and the synagogue was reopened on February 11, 1998 at a cost of 63 million Kč. The central hall is now often used for concerts from such legends as Joseph Malowany, Peter Dvorský, or Karel Gott, while the walls play host to temporary photographic exhibitions of various causes. The synagogue is still used for worship, but only in what was formerly the winter prayer room. The present number of Pilsner Jews is a little over 70.

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Founded: 1888
Category: Religious sites in Czech Republic

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User Reviews

Jan Vodička (17 months ago)
Nice building
Irena Sladká (18 months ago)
It is a really unique building from the 19th century. The Great synagogue is the third largest in the world and it has perfect acustics, so if you have a chance to go there for a concert, do not hesitate, you will not regret. It is situated in the city centre opposite the Great Theatre.
Garry Fryer (2 years ago)
Amazing experience to find out about other religion's and cultures came away having learnt quite a lot well worth the visit..
Shantanu Paranjape (2 years ago)
It was closed for tourists and we couldn't find any notice on the door stating this. We were left wondering whether there was another entrance to the synagogue.
Ivo Maryška (3 years ago)
a must see for every tourist interested in history and/judaism, this 3rd largest synagoge worldwide is a very odd, majestic and interesting place precisely because of both where it is and how large it is.
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