Hallstatt

Hallstatt, Austria

Hallstatt is a village in the Salzkammergut area. It is known for its production of salt, dating back to prehistoric times, and gave its name to the Hallstatt culture, a culture often linked to Celtic, Proto-Celtic, and pre-Illyrian peoples in Early Iron Age Europe, c.800–450 BC. Some of the earliest archaeological evidence for the Celts was found in Hallstatt.

The village also gave its name to the early Iron Age Celtic Hallstatt culture. Hallstatt is a popular tourist attraction owing to its small-town appeal and can be toured on foot in ten minutes.

The Hallstatt Museum has an unrivalled collection of discoveries from the local salt mines and from the cemeteries of Iron Age date near to the mines. The museum is close the Hallstattersee, below the salt mines on the mountainside. The museum, the salt mines, and the Dachstein Ice Cave are designated as an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Kastelholma Castle

First record of Kastelholma (or Kastelholm) castle is from the year 1388 in the contract of Queen Margaret I of Denmark, where a large portion of the inheritance of Bo Jonsson Grip was given to the queen. The heyday of the castle was in the 15th and 16th centuries when it was administrated by Danish and Swedish kings and stewards of the realms. Kastelhoma was expanded and enhanced several times.

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