Sankt Pölten Cathedral

Sankt Pölten, Austria

Sankt Pölten Cathedral has been the episcopal seat of the Diocese of Sankt Pölten since 1785, having previously been the church of the Augustinian Abbey of St. Pölten, dissolved in 1784. The building, despite being a well-preserved late Romanesque structure, is Baroque in appearance.

The use of the site for religious buildings is believed to date from around 790, when a Benedictine monastery was established here, to which were brought the relics of Saint Hippolytus, after whom the present city is named. In 828, the monastery became a possession of the Diocese of Passau, and a centre of missionary activity, predominantly in Great Moravia. After the invasion of the Magyars in around 907, the monastery was almost entirely destroyed, and was not rebuilt until after the Battle of Lechfeld in 955. The first documentary reference is in a charter of 976 from Emperor Otto II to Bishop Pilgrim of Passau.

Under Bishop Altmann of Passau the abbey became an Augustinian canonry, which was dissolved in 1784 as part of the Josephine Reforms.

In around 1150, the abbey church was rebuilt with three naves but no transept, with a westwork including two towers. In 1228 Bishop Gebhard changed the dedication, formerly to Saints Peter, Stephen and Hippolytus, to the Assumption of Mary. After a fire it was rebuilt again between 1267 and 1280. After another fire in 1621 the entire building was remodelled in the present Baroque style.

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Details

Founded: 1621
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.afar.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rosa Witasek (10 months ago)
Hab mich sehr wohl gefühlt hlt
Maria Mag. Zeller-Dollfuss (11 months ago)
Zur Ruhe kommen kann man hier im Advent bei den frühen Roratemessen um 6h!
Karl Kruse (18 months ago)
Sehr schöne Kirche
Flávio Ferro (19 months ago)
A catedral de Sankt Pölten "Dompfarre" no centro da cidade e próximo a estação central de trem (Hbf), é um templo de estilo românico/ barroco que data desde o século I e tem uma torre que pode ser de toda a cidade. O templo é dedicado a Assunção de Maria e está aberta durante o dia inteiro.
Imre Lakat (3 years ago)
Nyáron voltunk a városban . Igen szép , és kedvező benyomást váltott ki belőlünk . A Domplatz előtti tér feltárás alatt , de tanulságos , hogy a múlt emlékei napvilágra kerültek . Mindez a Dóm közvetlen szomszédságában látható . Most kettő képet tettem fel a feltárástól , ha később újra betemetik a feltárást , akkor is maradjon meg örökös emléknek , tanulságos látnivalónak Imre Lakat photographer
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