Mariazell Basilica

Mariazell, Austria

Mariazell Basilica is the most important pilgrimage destination in Austria and one of the most visited shrines in Europe. In the church, a miraculous wooden image of the Virgin Mary is honored.

The territory around Mariazell was given to the Monastery of St. Lambrecht around 1103, and the monks built cells there in order to serve the local residents. Legends give the town's founding day as December 21, 1157, but it is first documented in 1243. A Marian altar was dedicated there in 1266.

In the 14th century, a gothic church stood at Mariazell with a 90 m high spire and an ogive portal. In 1420 and 1474, the church was destroyed by fire. The church building was later expanded and redesigned in the Baroque style by Domenico Sciassia from 1644 to 1683. To the left and right of the gothic spire a baroque tower was built, the nave was lengthened and widened, and a dome was added on the eastern side. The high altar, consecrated in 1704, was designed by Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach.

The twelve side chapels each contain a baroque altar. The plaster stucco work of the organ gallery and the 1737 organ console was created by the Viennese sculptor Johann Wagner in 1740.

In front of the main entrance are two life-sized lead statues created by Balthasar Moll in 1757. To the left stands King Ludwig I of Hungary and to the right is Heinrich, Margrave of Moravia.

Legends

There are three basic legends about the founding of Mariazell and its development. The legend of the towns founding says that in 1157, the St. Lambrecht Monk Magnus was sent to the area of the current town as a minister. When his way was blocked by a rock, he set down the Marian figurine he had brought with him, whereby the rock broke apart and left Magnus' way clear. On a nearby bank, he settled down, placed the figurine on a tree trunk, and built a cell out of wood, which served as both his chapel and his living quarters.

The second legend relates how Henry Margrave of Moravia and his wife, having been healed of severe gout through the help of Our Lady of Mariazell made a pilgrimage to that place around 1200. There they built the first stone church on the site of the wooden chapel.

The third legend recounts a victorious battle of the Hungarian King Ludwig I over a numerically superior Turkish army. Out of thanks he built the gothic church and endowed it with the Schatzkammerbild ('treasury image') that he saw laid upon his chest in a dream.

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Details

Founded: 1644-1683
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Geo “GeO” 2020 Music Mix (6 days ago)
Very beautiful place in Austria- Mariazell ...with special architecture..
chetna bhutani (3 months ago)
It's beautiful and has a very positive vibe. Also its surrounding area has a different quaint setting.
Ferdinánd Jäckel (11 months ago)
Great view, and the whole village is made for scenery, turism. Highly recommended, parking is easy due to many signs.
Katalin Barbor (11 months ago)
I can recommend everyone to go here at least once. Wonderful, emotionally invigorating, soothing and uplifting.
Eva Maria Glanz-Possert (12 months ago)
Huge, beautiful well kept church in the middle of nowhere. The region shows a lot of signs of a long history. Worth exploring if one likes nature and loneliness.
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