Burgruine Aggstein is the remnant of a castle on the right bank of the Danube, north of Melk. According to archaeological excavations of the foundations of the castle it has been inferred that the castle was built in the early part of the 12th century. The castle was built by Manegold III Aggsbach Getbeen of the Kuenringer family descent and his son Aggstein Manegold IV inherited it as a fiefdom of Bavaria. They started living in the castle from 1180 onwards. Its notoriety was due to the 'robber barons' of Schloss Schonbuhel and Burg Agstein' who imprisoned their rivals for ransom and tied them to a rock ledge all the time threatening to kill them by throwing them into the gorge. In 1181, it came into the possession of the Kuenringer Aggsbach-Gansbach. The castle was besieged during the revolt of the Austrian nobility against Duke Albrecht I in 1295/96. Kuenringer Leutold occupied the castle from 1348 to 1355 and then it fell into disrepair.

In 1429, Duke Albrecht V pledged to rebuild the ruined castle because of its strategical point on the Danube. The purpose was to collect taxes from passing boats. In 1438, he built a riverbank toll house to regulate shipping on the Danube and used it as a front to accumulate wealth by robbery from ships. Later, another dishonest baron, Georg von Stain, occupied the castle but in 1476 he was caught and expelled and was forced to surrender the castle. Duke Leopold III took over the castle in 1477. It was occupied with tenants and carers in order to stop the looting which had taken place on the river in previous decades.

In 1529, the castle was burned down by a group of Turks during the first Turkish siege of Vienna. It was rebuilt and provided with loopholes for defence with the help of artillery. In 1606, Anna Baroness acquired the castle, but after her death, the castle was neglected. In 1685, the castle became the property of Count Ernst Rüdiger von Starhemberg. Then in 1819, one of his descendants, Ludwig Josef Gregor von Starhemberg, sold the castle to Count Franz von Beroldingen who renovated the castle in the 19th century. The Beroldingen family owned the castle until 1930 when the estate and the ruins of Schönbühel Aggstein were sold to Count Oswald von Seilern Aspang.

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Founded: 1180
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

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User Reviews

nehem1988 (2 years ago)
We were in Burgruine Aggstein on last Sunday. It is a really beautiful place, and the 8 Euro for the ticket is worth it, because the owners maintain the place. You can go up there on foot or by a bus (it costs 3 euro/1 person). That was one of my best experiences.
Lucy Todd (2 years ago)
Absolutely stunning! Definitely one of the highlights of my holiday! Highly recommend!!
Mahdi Dehghan (2 years ago)
Qell worth a visit, really give you the feel of what it was like the days gone. Really nice views across the valley and the river.
Vasilis Karakostas (2 years ago)
A must place to visit. You need to park your car under the castle and then you have two options, go uphill by walking or with the bus(2€), entrance to the castle is 6 Euros. The castle look very good. The view from Danube and the valley is amazing. Many places to buy some small things or some gifts. Few places where you can eat and drink. Very nice nature surrounding the castle.
Ian Kirton (2 years ago)
Fantastic views of the Danube Valley. Had a real feel of history, all notices in German so my translater became well used. Didn't real need translater to just enjoy the atmospheric buildings and fantastic views.
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