Walpersdorf Palace

Walpersdorf, Austria

Schloss Walpersdorf is a Renaissance castle built in 1571 by Hans Ulrich von Ludmanstorf who died next year. The castle was completed in 1619. It was badly damaged in the World War II and restored later. Today the palace is a venue for concerts and events.

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Details

Founded: 1571
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

More Information

www.schloss-walpersdorf.at

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Manuela Kronister (7 months ago)
Very nice castle, unfortunately not open in the past monastery
Christian Haag (12 months ago)
The renaissance castle Walpersdorf was built in 1571 by Hans Ulrich von Ludmanstorf, which was then expanded by Helmhard VIII Freiherr von Jörger and completed by his son Helmhard the Younger in 1619. During the Thirty Years' War the castle went to Empress Eleonora Gonzaga. After her death, Georg Ludwig von Sinzendorf bought the castle, who built a silk mill there. Marie Countess Falkenhayn finally bequeathed Walpersdorf Castle to the Order of the Missionary Sisters of St. Petrus Claver. The castle was badly damaged in World War II and repaired after the war. Until 2014 it was owned by the Missionary Order. The castle has housed the Lederleitner interior store since 2014. Admission is free, a tour through the beautifully designed exhibition rooms is a must for all friends of upscale home decor! The castle chapel is very popular for dream weddings, the "Castle Kitchen Walpersdorf Blauenstein" located in the castle, an insider tip for gourmets!
Christian Haag (12 months ago)
The renaissance castle Walpersdorf was built in 1571 by Hans Ulrich von Ludmanstorf, which was then expanded by Helmhard VIII Freiherr von Jörger and completed by his son Helmhard the Younger in 1619. During the Thirty Years' War the castle went to Empress Eleonora Gonzaga. After her death, Georg Ludwig von Sinzendorf bought the castle, who built a silk mill there. Marie Countess Falkenhayn finally bequeathed Walpersdorf Castle to the Order of the Missionary Sisters of St. Petrus Claver. The castle was badly damaged in World War II and repaired after the war. Until 2014 it was owned by the Missionary Order. The castle has housed the Lederleitner interior store since 2014. Admission is free, a tour through the beautifully designed exhibition rooms is a must for all friends of upscale home decor! The castle chapel is very popular for dream weddings, the "Castle Kitchen Walpersdorf Blauenstein" located in the castle, an insider tip for gourmets!
Roman Hillinger (14 months ago)
Yes, pretty nice to look at anyway - and if you come here to eat, then it's (maybe) worth it. We made the detour because we wanted to visit "the sight". However, it doesn't pay off ...
Roman Hillinger (14 months ago)
Yes, pretty nice to look at anyway - and if you come here to eat, then it's (maybe) worth it. We made the detour because we wanted to visit "the sight". However, it doesn't pay off ...
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