Saatse Seto Museum

Värska, Estonia

Saatse Seto Museum was opened in the former schoolhouse on 1 July 1974. The renovated museum is small and cosy and it displays the most extensive collection of historical objects in Setomaa. It also includes a large wooden figure of Peko, the god of fertility, created by local artist Renaldo Veeber. The museum possesses a beautiful park spreading over several hectares with a study trail, only a few hundred metres from Russia.

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Address

Saatse, Värska, Estonia
See all sites in Värska

Details

Founded: 1974
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: Soviet Occupation (Estonia)

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wünsche Martina (6 months ago)
Ein sehr informatives kleines Museum, in dem die Lebensweise der Seto-Bevölkerung gezeigt wird. Interessant ist vor allem die Herkunft und Verbreitung der verschiedenen Völkerschaften, die von Nordostsibirien bis nach Lappland verbreitet sind. Freundliche Museumsmitarbeiter. Die Lage: im südöstlichsten Zipfel von Estland, in unmittelbarer Grenznähe zu Russland.
Jarmo Leinonen (7 months ago)
Hieno museo venäjän rajalla.
Janek Koldekivi (7 months ago)
Eriline muuseum koos väga toreda teenindusega!
Tarmo Pungas (7 months ago)
A very good place to learn about Seto culture. The setting is also fitting: it's very close to the Estonian-Russian border.
Krista Vaikmets (2 years ago)
Superarmas koht ja töötaja, kellel on aega rääkida ja tutvustada setode eluolu
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