Château de Puissalicon

Puissalicon, France

Château de Puissalicon was built in the 11th century. Two imposing towers lies over the dungeon which is now in ruins. The castle is privately owned, but can be visited in part during the Heritage Days in September.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erich Johnson (19 months ago)
We arrived just after sunset, but even then you could tell we were in a spectacular location. Upon arrival we were greeted by a very friendly reception staff, and were immediately made comfortable. The presentation/staging of the room was perfect and they even had an electric heater brought just in case we got cold. Being Canadian, we were fine! We then had a great prix fixe dinner with impeccably presented and delicious food. The foie gras with figue tartinade was amazing. Also, very reasonably priced. When we woke up, we quickly realised that we were surrounded by vineyards and, well, more castles. Overall a great experience and already planning our next stay.
David Barnes (2 years ago)
A beautiful setting, lovely landscape. Very friendly service. Good food.
Ellie Gomperts (2 years ago)
Had a wonderful spa experience here today. Frankly one of the nicest spa’s I’ve been to in Europe. What makes it this good? The tasteful, chic and well thought out decor, the staff, both highly professional and genuinely friendly, the quality of the treatments, not to mention the tranquil surroundings amidst the vineyards. Looking forward to returning here shortly.
teal druda (2 years ago)
Beautiful location, amazing customer service....will go back next time in town!
Ruby Casey (4 years ago)
We loved every minute of our time at this newly renovated Chateau (the younger sister of the equally stunning Chateau Les Carrasses). The combination of St Pierre's setting - with views of vineyards as far as the eye can see, an amazing spa, great food & wine, and a truly beautiful wine cellar, this place ticked every box for us. Very friendly and helpful staff too. When we return to France again, we will definitely be returning here! Thank you for such a great time.
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Kisimul Castle

Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.